SPECIAL ISSUE ON BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/34
Imapct Factor: 6.177
ISSN: 2278-8808
Date: 04-Jul-2017

An International Peer Reviewed

Scholarly Research Journal for Interdisciplinary Studies


Dinesh Chandra

GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE AND RESEARCH AGENDA

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/34, Page - 1/4

 Climatic problems, and our perceptions of their current and future health effects, have changed over the decades. About 20–40 years back, public health was most concerned about localized climatic degradation. Although it was often difficult to measure the direct health effects. As a result, some of the localized climatic problems of the 20th century have been solved, at least in the richer parts of the world.1

We have since become aware, however, of the threats to human health which operate at a much larger geographical scale, and because of their non‐localized character, are even more difficult to investigate. All these “global climatic changes” are due to increased human pressure on the environment, of which the main drivers are population growth and an increase in per capita resource use and waste production. Climate change and other changes to the atmosphere, land use changes and soil degradation, freshwater depletion and contamination, and biodiversity loss are four important categories of global climatic change, each of which form potential, although partly or largely unknown, threats to human health.2 What should mass education public health research do to help humanity cope with these new climatic problems is the aim of this paper.

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Koplan J P, Fleming D W. Current and future public health challenges. JAMA 20002841696–1698.1698 McMichael A J. Planetary overload. Global climatic change and the health of the human species. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993 Corvalan C, Hales S, McMichael A J. Ecosystems and human well?being. Health synthesis. A report of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. Geneva: World Health Organization, 2005 Patz J A, Campbell?Lendrum D, Holloway T. et al Impact of regional climate change on human health. Nature 2005438310–317.317

Satyendra Singh Chahar

TERTIARY EDUCATION AND NATIONAL EDUCATION POLICY

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/34, Page - 5/10

 The formal education system is developed by the society so as to play a role in human resource development. It uses certain proportion of society\'s human and non-human resources and helps in national development. Thus, a country\'s budget provides for expenditure on different sectors of education. In order to enhance the level of economic development of a country, technical advancement emd indigenous researches are equally important which are possible only through the system of higher education. authorities identify the needs of each college based on its location effectively; ii) allocate resources according to the needs, that is, more resources should be allotted to rural areas; iii) authorities can have a check over the expenditure of institutions, so that the money spent on education is utilised optimally and on academic activities. iv) the Government and college administration should pay more attention to staff development programmes through an integral approach, where staff development is an essential component which relates to the needs of the teachers and the institutions. These staff development programmes could include induction programmes for new teachers, refresher courses aimed at updating subject knowledge and keeping pace with new teaching methods and techniques, team development programmes, relationship training programmes and management training programmes for college principals, and heads of departments.
Key Words: Tertiary Education, Gurukul Pattern, Social Justice, NEP ( New Education Policy)

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Ghosh D. :Education Development Challenge - Vol. L New Delhi: Discovery publishing, 1981. Singh S D : University System in India.: Rahul publication, Jabalpur ,1983. Gupta S&,Gupta M. : Higher Education Towards 21" Century. New Delhi: Anmol publication, 1997. KualJ.: Higher Education. Social Change and National Deyelopment. Simla: Indian Institute of Adyanced Study, 1975.

Zeenat Zaidi

HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/34, Page - 11/15

 

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White, R. and Heckenberg, D.2011. What is hazardous waste and what makes it hazardous. University of Tasmania. Misra, V. and Pandey, S.D.2005. Hazardous waste, impact on health and environment for development of better waste management strategies in future in India. Grasso, D., Kahn, D., Kaseva, M. E. and Mbuligwe, S. E. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT – Hazardous Waste Rushton, L.2003, Health hazards and waste management. British Medical Bulletin 2003; 68: 183–197 http://cpcb.nic.in/Hazardous_waste.php

Anjani Rani

BEHAVIOURAL AND MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN FRESH WATER FISH CHANNA PUNCTATUS DUE TO FLUORIDE TOXICITY

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/34, Page - 16/19

  

Present study has been planned to access the effect of flouride on behavioural and morphological alteration in fresh water fish Channa punctatus. Fishes were exposed to sub lethal concentration of fluoride (30 mg/litre and 60 mg/litre) after 3 months exposure, their behavioural pattern like surfacing activity, feeding habit, opercular movement; swimming activity, etc were observed. Also their morphological character such as coloration of body pigmentation, mucus secretion and fin structure were noticed. Observations were compared with control group.

Key words:- Flouride toxicity, Channa punctatus, opercular movement, feeding habit, fin, colour pattern.

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Chand, D. (2001) Flouride in drinking water: A challenge of the millennium Proc. Int,Workshop on fluoride in drinking water: strategies, management and mitigation. Chinoy, N.J.(1991) Effect of fluoride on physiology of animal and human beings. Ind. J Environ. Toxicol. Fingerman, S. W. and Russel, L.C.(1980) Effect of the polychlorinated biphenyl Aroclor 1242 on locomotor activity and on the neurotransmitters dopamine and norepinephrine in brain of the gulf killi fish fundulus grandis. Bull. Environ. Contam. Toxicol

Kavita Singh Chaudhary & Rohit Kumar Singh

BUDDHISM AND CONSERVATION OF BIODIVERSITY

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/34, Page - 20/29

 An earnest attempt has been made by the researcher to examine the various problems relating to biodiversity and to justify the need for protection and conservation of biodiversity, for the growth of legislation regarding conservation of biodiversity– both substantive and procedural and for the enforcement and implementation of such laws as well as international treaties and conventions relating to conservation of biodiversity in India.

The Planet Earth appears to be at unrest. Among the global environmental problems climate change, depletion of biological resources, ozone layer depletion and pollution of international waters, depletion of biological resources, extinction of species is considered by many environmentalists unique in the sense that its depletion is irretrievable. The severity of the problem is confirmed by the Global Species Assessment, which is produced by the Red List Consortium comprising International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and its Species Survival Commission. The degradation of Biodiversity is an inevitable phenomenon in a global perspective. The ever increasing menace of Biodiversity degradation at a very rapid pace can be attributed primarily to man’s contemptuous attitude towards nature. Biodiversity represents the totality of genes, species and ecosystems in a region. All the biological variables on the planet earth interacting with one another and with the physical environment form the foundation of sustainable development. The \\worldwide destruction of natural environment by population explosion, wild habitat loss and fragmentation, over exploitation of natural resources has led to a tremendous loss of biological diversity. The global biodiversity strategy (Anon.,1992) highlighted the needs for the conservation of biological diversity for sustainability. Accordingly, the most effective and efficient mechanism to conserve the biological diversity is to prevent the destruction or degradation of habitat, through jn situ methods. The management of natural protected areas is much emphasized in this regard.The effective conservation of biological diversity in the natural protected areas is ultimately based on the involvement of the local people. The culture, faith and traditions of the local people towards the natural world gaining prominence in the present day environmental deterioration. The global conservation strategy highlighted the strengthening of research on ethical, cultural and religious issues related to biodiversity

Key Words: Mythology, Buddhism, Conservation, Behavioral change, Vulnerable Species.

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H. S. A. Yahya, Biodiversity Conservation Ethics in Major Religions, Blvominton, Indiana 86(2010). Sponsel, Leslie E. and Poranee Natadecha – Sponsel, “Non-violent Ecology: The Possibilities of Buddhism”, 139-150(1991). D. C. Srivastava, Readings in Environmental Ethics: Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 92(2005). Richard Howell, God, Human and Nature: Some Reflections from the Viewpoint of Christian Theism, 98 (2005).

Lalit Kumar Singh

BIO-DIVERSITYCONSERVATION – CONCEPT AND NEED

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/34, Page - 30/35

India is a very ancient civilization, a highly developed one in which all aspects of life were blended harmoniously resulting in a very healthy lifestyle both physically and spiritually. The earth has always been described in our ancient scriptures as the mother who nourishes and sustains the human race and all the living beings. The Vedas tell us clearly that the earth is our mother and we are all her children. Just as a mother brings up her children lovingly, so does the mother earth and it is our duty to revere all that were receive from her and return it back through love and care.1 Human beings began their journey with a prayer, “Oh Mother Earth, shower everlasting glory and bless without there being any apprehension of extinction”, and Indra-Gupta Prithvi continued to fulfil the urge. Gradually human beings became ignorant about the benevolence of Mother Earth. They then turned themselves to be mankind.2

Different cultures developed in different landscapes that influenced activities, occupations, diet, language, and architecture. Cultures adapted to local environmental challenges by growing local domestic crops, developing irrigation and terracing systems, hunting, fishing, and gathering. Biodiversity provides a sense of place. Countries and states have flagship animals and plants that are a source of pride and highlight the uniqueness of each habitat . Travel, which provides great pleasure to many people, is motivated by the desire to see this combination of cultural, landscape and biological diversity. In India, the concept of environment protection can be seen starting from the period of Vedas. All four major Vedas ( The Rigveda, The Samaveda, The Yajurveda and The Atharva Veda) recognize the importance of maintenance of the seasons\' cycles that are likely to get altered due to the climate change owing to inappropriate human actions. It is remarkable that the people in Vedic times regarded Nature and the environment in a holistic manner and revered each of its constituents and entities be carefully preserving them. It is interesting to know that the ancient Vedas have several references in them on environmental protection, ecological balance, weather cycles, rainfall phenomena, hydrologic cycle, and related subjects that directly indicate the high level of awareness of the seers and people of that time.

Being spiritual and religious text Indian mythology and the religious literature may be used as a tool of biodiversity conservation.

Key Words: Mythology, Vedas, Mores and Rituals, Vedic Literature, Poaching, Habitat, Religion, Dogmatism (Bigotry)s, Religious Proceedings, Celebrant, Rubrics.

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Arvind Jasrotia, “The Value of Nature: A Holistic Perception”, S Vemuri (ed.) Connected Accountabilities: Environmental Justice and Global Citizenship, 19-35(2009), Inter-disciplinary Press, 2. Oxford; See also, Ashok A. Desai, Environmental Jurisprudence , xi(2008) O. P. Dwivedi “Environmental Ethics: Our Dharma to the Environment” 17(1994) in O. P. Dwivedi (ed.) op.cit. S. Jhalani, “Ancient Wisdom of Environment,” Daily Excelsior, April 17, 2010. Kumar, Surendra. The Vishuddha Manusmiriti (An Edition of the Manusmiriti, Completely Purged of Interpolated Verses) Hindi Editon. A Research Publication, 1996. Ajai Mansingh. Stewards of Creation Covenant: Hinduism and the Environment Caribbean Quarterly. 1995, 41-1.

Indradeo Singh

A MODEL FOR AUTOMATED DETECTION AND CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM VEHICLES

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/34, Page - 36/39

 Concrete slab with opening are usually designed with help of traditional rules thumb proposed by building codes. Such methods however introduce limitations concerning size of opening and magnitude of applied loads. Furthermore there is a lack of sufficient information about the load carrying capacity of slab with opening. It is also difficult to model the complex behaviour of reinforced concrete structures analytically in its non-linear zone. This has led engineers in the past to rely heavily on empirical formulas which were derived numerous experiments for the design of reinforced concrete structures. Nowadays, for structural design and assessment of reinforced concrete members, the non-linear finite element (FE) analysis has become an important analytical tool. This thesis investigates the structural behaviour of two way reinforced concrete slab with and without for different slab length ratios and different opening ratios. The effect of openings sizes on crack formation is also analyzed. For this different models of slab with and without opening were modeled in finite element software ANSYS.

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P. Vijnatha Raju, R.V.R.S. Aravind, B. Sangeeth Kumar, “Pollution Monitoring System Using Wireless Sensor Network In Visakhapatnam”, IJETT, Volume 4, Issue 4, April-2013. Amir Salarpour, Arezoo Salarpour - “Vehicle Tracking Using Kalman Filter And Features Signal & Image Processing”, An International Journal, Volume 2, Issue 2, Pp: 1-8, June 2011. G. Anuradha, “Self Automated Tool In Vehicular System That Identifies The Air Pollution And The Future Of E-Governs”, IJIES, Volume, Issue 12, November 2013. Pooja Pathe, Prof. R.H. Talwekar - “GPRS Based Routing & Routing & Tracking Of Mobile Vehicles Using ARM”, International Journal of Engineering Research And Applications, Volume 2, Issue 4, Pp: 1088-1090, 2012.

Vijendra Singh

CHARACTERIZE THE QUALITY OF WASTEWATER OF AMANISHAH NALA OF JAIPUR CITY

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/34, Page - 40/49

 

Jaipur (longitude : 950 24’ E ; latitude : 270 18’ N), a city located at the central part of Rajasthan, is undergoing rapid urbanization and industrialization. Wastewater generated from various industries discharged into ‘AMANISHAH NALA’ and this water was sampled from eleven different industrial sites, during pre–monsoon session, where this water is used for irrigation purpose. The concentrations of pH, Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, SO42–, CO32–, HCO3–, TH, NO3–, F–, and DO are within permissible limits but definite contaminations with special reference to EC, Cl–, TDS, COD & BOD in wastewater have been observed, calls for at least primary treatment of wastewater before being used for irrigation.

Key words: Physico–Chemical Properties, Wastewater, Percent Sodium, Water Pollution and Sodium , Absorption Ratio.

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U.S. Sreeramulu, J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 42(4), 525–532 (1994). Jayashri Jagdap, Bhushan Kachawe, Leena Deshpande and Prakash Kelkar, Water Quality Assessment of the Purna River for Irrigation Purpose in Buldana District, Maharastra, Indian J. Environ. Health, 44(3), 247–257 (2002). M.F. Hussain and I. Ahmad, Variability in Physico–Chemical Parameters of Pachin River (Itanagar), Indian J. Environ. Health, 44(4), 329–336 (2002). S.A. Abbasi, F.I. Khan, K. Sentilvelan and A. Shabudeen, Modelling of Buckinggham Canal Water Quality, Indian J. Environ. Health, 44(4), 290–297 (2002). K.N. Patnaik, S.V. Satyanarayana and Rout Swoyam Poor, Water Pollution from Major Industries In Pradip Area – A Case Study, Indian J. Environ. Health, 44(3), 203–211 (2002). D.D. Khedkar and A.J. Dixit, Evaluate Suitability of Ambanala Water, Amravati, for Irrigation, Indian Water Works Association, 35(5), 230–233 (2003).

Syeeda Khatoon

BETTER ENERGY ALTERNATIVE FOR DELHI

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/34, Page - 50/57

  

The level of Pollution in Delhi is really a point of concern, keeping inconsideration public health of the resident, as air pollution is a major cause of illness and premature deaths. The problem needs to be addressed immediately instead of providing lip service to the whole problem in the form of Odd-Even. With the rise of Asian economies, including India, output and wealth continues to grow, meaning thereby more vehicles on the road. The transport sector has become the fastest growing source of greenhouse gas emissions. So there is need for clean, Green and better energy alternative for Delhi which help in improving local air quality.To fulfil this objective, Delhi government need to work instantly on green infrastructure technology and policy evolution. 

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Amanda Belik (2013 a),Biogas Contributes to a Diverse Renewable Fuel Mix, Great plains Institute,http://www.betterenergy.org/blog/biogas-contributes-diverse-renewable-fuel-mix, Accessed on 10 April 2016 Amanda Belik (2013b), Infrastructure Critical to Biogas as Transportation Fuel, Great plains Institute,http://www.betterenergy.org/blog/infrastructure-critical-biogas-transportation-fuelb, Accessed on 10 April 2016

Sanghmitra

STATUS OF THE NOXIOUS WEED PARTHENIUM HYSTEROPHORUS AT ALLAHABAD AND ITS POSSIBLE ELIMINATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/34, Page - 58/62

 Weed Parthenium is directly responsible for health problem or allergies and indirectly for spread of diseases. Several attempts have been made to eradicate this weed by using physical, chemical and biological method but success is still eluding. In the present study survey of Parthenium in different localities of Allahabad was conducted, predominant and luxuriant growth of Parthenium were recorded. During survey Parthenium feeding insects, Parthenium replacing weeds and Fungi infested Parthenium plans were observed.

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Nikunaj Bhardwaj, Pratibha Teotia & Swati Pandit

PROBLEMS, SUSTAINABILITY, AND POTENTIAL APPLICATION OF BIOCHAR AS A LOW-COST ADSORBENT FOR REMOVAL OF HEAVY METALS: A SHORT REVIEW

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/34, Page - 63/66

 Ground water, originated from natural and anthropogenic source each contaminated by heavy metals like Cu, Ni and Zn which are toxic and carcinogenic that could cause health problems in humans. Thus, it is a vital role for removal of heavy metal ions from wastewaters, before they are arrived to the environment. Conversation of agricultural residues to from biochar can be used as for as the treatment of aqueous solution an alternative remediation of heavy metals from the environment used as low-cost adsorbent. Biochar is pyrogenic black carbon coming from thermal degradation (e.g., pyrolysis) of carbon-rich biomass in an environment which is an oxygen-limited technology. Due to its high surface area, charged surface, and functional groups, influencing depth, Control density, Biochar is of great potential to adsorb heavy metal and organic contaminants. Addition of Biochar should decrease the Leachibility, bioavailability, toxicity, and mobility of organic and inorganic pollutants. Mathematical models can accurately describe the interaction of heavy metals with biochar. Furthermore, if pre-loading of biochar with nutrients can have benefits compared to adding both separately; this would further strengthen the case for biochar integrating into the wastewater management system. In recent years, biochar has gained increasing attention due to its multi-functionality including carbon sequestration and enhancement of soil fertility production of bio-energy and environmental remediation.
Keywords: Ground water pollution, Adsorption, Pyrolysis, Biochar, Carbon sequestration

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1. Ahmad M., Lee S.S., Dou X., Mohan D., Sung J.K., Yang J.E. and O.K.Y.S., Effects of pyrolysis temperature on soybean stover-and peanut shell-derived biochar properties and TCE adsorption in water, Bioresour. Technol., 118, 36–54, (2012) 2. Blaylock M.J., Huang J.W., Raskin I.B.D., Ensley Eds., Wiley, New York, N.Y, USA, Phytoextraction of metals, in Phytoremediation of Toxic Metals: Using Plants to Clean up the Environment, 53–70 (2000) 3. Cao X., Ma L., Gao B. and Harris W., Dairy-manure derived biochar effectively sorbs lead and atrazine, Environ. Sci. Technol., 43, 3285–3291, (2009) 4. Chen B., Chen Z., Sorption of naphthalene and 1-naphthol by biochars of orange peels with different pyrolytic temperatures, Chemosphere, 76, 127–133, (2009) 5. Chen W., Parette R., Zou J., Cannon F.S., Dempsey B.A., Arsenic removal by iron-modified activated carbon, Water Res., 41, 1851–1858 (2007)