SPECIAL ISSUE ON INCLUSIVE EDUCATION FOR DYNAMIC AND EQUIABLE SOCIETIES H. G. M. ACE 4/32, 2017

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32
Imapct Factor: 6.177
ISSN: 2278-8808
Date: 30-Jul-2017

An International Peer Reviewed

Scholarly Research Journal for Interdisciplinary Studies


Prof. Aakanksha Landge & Praveen Kumar Yadav

INDIVIDUAL INTEGRATION TO INITIATE INCLUSION EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 1/6

 Education in Pune is some of the finest in India and has various types. Pune was called "The Oxford of the east" by Jawaharlal Nehru, India\\\\\\\'s first Prime Minister. Pune attracts students not only from different states of India but all over the world.Schools in Pune are either run by the Pune Municipal Corporation, in which case they are called public schools, or privately by trusts and individuals. Private schools have been preferred by a majority of city residents because of better facilities, and in some cases, for the use of English language as the medium of instruction. A number of Marathi medium schools are more than a century old, notable among them include Huzurpaga girls\\\\\\\' school and New English School, which was started by Bal Gangadhar Tilak. All schools are affiliated either with the Maharashtra state SSC board or the all-India Indian Certificate of Secondary Education (ICSE), CBSE or NIOS boards.The research focuses on the quality of education in the municipal schools of Pune at Alandi. The research also tends to bring a change in the syllabus and pattern of teaching into these schools by inclusion of CBSE, ICSE, or CONVENT SCHOOL standards or syllabus to give a quality education to the students and help them making equipped with the “Powerful Tool” of better quality education.

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

http://www.specialeducationguide.com/pre-k-12/inclusion/whats-inclusion-theory-and-practice/ "What is Inclusive Design". Inclusive Design Research Centre. OCAD University. Retrieved 13 November 2015. Wilkinson, Richard; Pickett, Kate (2010). The Spirit Level- Why Equity is Better for Everyone (2010 ed.). England: Penguin Books. p. 113. ISBN 978-0-241-95429-4 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Education_in_Pune

Prof. Sarika Gautam Bahirat

EQUITY AND INCLUSION OUTSIDE SCHOOL WALLS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 7/12

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Sharma.Y, Sharma M(2014) Inclusive Educationspecial Educational needs. New Delhi Kanishka Publishers, Distributor. Ramaswamy B. (2013)Planning and management of special and inclusive Education, New Delhi kanishka publishers Distributors. KaurRajender (2013)Special and Inclusive school Education , New Delhi kanishka publishers Distributors. Madhumitapuri , George A (2004). handbook of Inclusive education, New Delhi sage publication. Schulz Jane B, Carpenter C (1995).Mainstreaming Exceptional Students.published by allynard Bacon

Porf. Manjiri Dhere & Prof. Vishakha Hendre

ENHANCING VOCATIONAL SKILLS: NEED OF THE LEARNERS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 13/15

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Prof. Nilofar N. Patel

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION IN B.A.B.ED COURSE WITH REFERENCE TO SAVITRIBAI PHULE PUNE UNIVERSITY

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 16/21

Inclusion in education is an approach to educating students with special educational needs. Under the inclusion model, students with special needs spend most or all of their time with non-special needs students. Inclusion rejects the use of special schools or classrooms to separate students with disabilities from students without disabilities. Inclusive education means that all students attend and are welcomed by their neighbourhood schools in age-appropriate, regular classes and are supported to learn, contribute and participate in all aspects of the life of the school. B.A.B.Ed syllabus is focuses on inclusive education. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Dr. Sujata Adamuthe & Prof. Rashi Dubey Mishra

CONTRIBUTION OF NGO TOWARDS INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 22/28

\"\\"\\\\"\\\\"\\"\"This paper focuses on the status of inclusive education in our country.It also elaborates on the role of the NGOs in the education of the underprivileged.The contribution of a Pune based NGO the Bharatiya Jain Sanghatana(BJS) is also remarkable in this field which needs to be understood is also highlighted. The Education system of a country does not function in isolation from the society of which it is a part. Hierarchies of castes, economic status,gender relations and cultural diversities as well as uneven economic development also deeply influence issues relating to access and equity in education. The Right to Education approach in schools favours the evolution from integrated education to inclusive education were the environment is adjusted according to the needs of the child.The school system of a country  must be adjusted to meet the needs of all its children.ManyNon governmentorganisations are working at the grassroot level to improve the education standards and providing it to the underprivileged sector of our society.They are also generating awareness about the importance of education in the remote areas and the underprivileged section of the society. BJS an NGO running in Pune with a vision of holistic development of society has shown significant contribution in upliftment of the underprivileged children and is working to give them a brighter future through their disaster response strategies, women empowerment, minorityeducation, formaleducation, Career guidance ,research etc.

Keywords- Inclusive education ,NGO, underprivileged ,holistic development 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Scheyeret al. (1996). The Inclusive Classroom Teacher Created Materials, Inc. The Inclusive Classroom"What is Inclusive Design". Wilkinson, Richard; Pickett, Kate (2010). The Spirit Level- Why Equity is Better for Everyone (2010 ed.). England: Penguin Books. p. 113. Cresswell,J.W.(2012).Educational Research.(4th ed.)Boston, MA:Pearson Education. Yin,R.K.(1994).Case Study Research:Design and Methods.ThousandOaks,CA:Sage. Chandwani,S.(2013)NGO participation in elementary Education an analytical study.Unpublished.PhDthesis,Lovely Professional University.Retrieved from http://shodh.inflibnet.ac.in/bitstream/123456789/1739/1/synopsis.pdf About BJS.(n.d). In bjsindia.Retrieved April 14,2016,fromhttp://bjsindia.org/about.html About Founder.(n.d).In bjsindia.Retrieved April14,2016,from http://bjsindia.org/Founder.html Vision &Mision.(n.d). ).In bjsindia.Retrieved April14,2016,fromhttp://bjsindia.org/about.html#noAction Events.(n.d).In bjsindia.Retrieved April14,2016,from http://bjsindia.org/events.html Activities &Programmes.(n.d). In bjsindia.Retrieved April14,2016,fromhttp://bjsindia.org/activities.html Mission.(n.d).In bjscollege.Retrieved April 14,2016,from http://www.bjscollege.org.in/bjs/index.php/about-us/mission-vision Infrastructure.(n.d).In thefreedictionary.Retrieved April14,2016,from http://www.thefreedictionary.com/infrastructure BJS Survey of Farmer-suicide affected families in Marathwada.(2015). BJS Survey Report.Pune. Maharashtra: Number of farmer suicides in Marathwada crosses 800 mark.(2015,October18).IndianExpress.Retrieved from http://indianexpress.com/article/india/india-news-india/maharashtra-number-of-farmer-suicides-in-marathwada-crosses-800-mark/

Dr. C. A. Shignte & Prof. S. G. Shikare

ROLE OF THE TEACHER IN SOCIAL INCLUSION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 29/33


Social inclusion is a process encouraging social interaction between people with different socially relevant attributes or an impersonal instructional mechanism of opening up access to participation in all spheres of social life. Social inclusion requires teachers to accept the responsibility to promote it. There is central role of teachers in promoting social inclusion. Teachers do make a positive contribution to children’s lives & learning.The paper explained the meaning, need & importance of social inclusion & the role of teacher in promoting social inclusion.

Key words – social inclusion, teacher’s role 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

RaoUsha(2012), INCLUSIVE EDUCATION. Mumbai, Himalaya Publishing House. Khakal D., (2017), School & Inclusive School, Shree Prakashan, Pune https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inclusion_(education) www.academia.edu/.../IMPORTANCE_OF_INCLUSIVE_EDUCATION_. www.create-rpc.org/pdf_documents/PTA15.pdf www.education-inquiry.net/index.php/edui/article/view/27311 https://www.duo.uio.no/.../MaiaxJavakhishvilix-MasterxsxthesisxFinal.op... www.eenet.org.uk/resources/eenet_newsletter/news7/page3.php https://prezi.com/.../social-inclusion-anecdotal-experiences-and-the-teacher-...

Usha Pardeshi

SAMAJIK SAMAVESHKATA - BHARTIY PADIPREKSHYA ME

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 34/40

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Prof. Mumtaz Shaikh & Miss. Shaikh Bushra Vazir Ahmed

ROLE OF GLOBALIZATION IN INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 41/46

This paper tries to Role of Globalization In Inclusive Education. This review begins with the concept of Globalization which is transmitted in societies throughout the world are now passing through the process of profound and rapid change. This change is closely related with the process of globalization. The review then analyses concept of inclusive education.  The review then examines educational reforms in school. The review then examine role of globalization in inclusive education and policies for inclusive learners.

Keywords: Globalization, inclusive education, inclusion, inclusive school, Neo liberalism, policies. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Ann Cheryl Armstrong, Derrick Armstrong & Ilektra SpandagouInclusive Education: International policies & Practice, Sage Publications Ltd oseph Zajda: Globalization, Education and Social Justice,springer publication Ltd Manfred Steger, Paul Battersby, Joseph Siracusa: Globalization, Sage Publications Ltd Ž. M. Milenovi?: Inclusive education as a consequence Metodi?ki obzori 12, vol. 6(2011)2 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/265051334_One_nation_globalization_and_inclusive_education Journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.3102/0091732X030001065 http://www.eera-ecer.de/ecer-programmes/conference/20/contribution/34101/ https://www.wto.org/english/res_e/booksp_e/glob_soc_sus_e_chap9_e.pdf http://www.csnlg.com/blog/the-concept-of-inclusive-education-and- understanding-children-with-special-needs/ http://www.specialeducationguide.com/pre-k-12/inclusion/

Dr. Madhuri Yadav

IMPACT OF FAMILY, TEACHERS & PEERS ATTITUDE ON BEHAVIOUR OF DISABLED CHILD-A CASE STUDY

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 47/53

Education is the right of every child because it equips him to meet the challenges of life. The children with disabilities need this all the more, to supplement their differential talents so that they can prepare themselves for a happy productive and useful life. Efforts to educate children with disabilities began soon after independence in India. An attempt has been made to examine the policies and legislations for educating the children with disabilities in India after post- constitution era. There is no doubt that the dream for discrimination free and equal right for the disabled children may require a comprehensive change in the institutional arrangements and legal provisions but the most important change has to come in the minds of all the members of the society, their thinking and attitude towards the disabled. The present research was focused on the study of impact of family, teachers and peers on behaviour of the disabled girl child. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Dalal, A.K. &Pande, N. (1999). Cultural Beliefs and family care of the children with disabilities. Journal of psychology and developing societies; 11:55-75. Gearheart, B. R. and Wishann, W.W. (1984).The Exceptional student in Regular Classroom (3rd Edition) Times Mirrow/Mosby College Hedrick, J. (1997). Parents and professional working together. An introduction to early childhood special education Boston: Allyn and Bacon. NCERT (2000).Assessment of Needs for Inclusive Education: Report of the First Regional Workshop for SAARC Countries. New Delhi: NCERT. Nosek, M. A. and R. B. Hughes (2003).“Psychological issues of women with physical disabilities; the continuing gender debate.”Rehabilitation Counselling Bulletin 46 (4); 224. Okot, M., Eron.L. &Kutosi, G., W., (2000).Special needs education, module 1.Kenya institute of special education, Nairobi. Shea, M. T. &Baver, M.A. (1991).Parents and teachers of children with exceptionalities. Boston: Allyn and Bacon. Winzer, G. (1993).Parental satisfaction with special Education.http://www.class uft.edu/CLAS/Jur/0012/paper/paper-childs.html. URL’s www.education.nic.in/html web/iedc_sch_draft.htm https://brage.bibsys.no/xmlui/bitstream/handle/11250/278161/Chaula.pdf?sequence=1 http://indianexpress.com/article/cities/pune/only-123-temporary-teachers-for-17600-special-children/ http://ir.uiowa.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2631&context=etd http://www.lse.ac.uk/asiaResearchCentre/_files/ARCWP34-DasKattumuri.pdf http://drum.lib.umd.edu/bitstream/handle/1903/7281/umi-umd-4682.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y http://www.educationforallinindia.com/research_abstratcs_on_education_NIPCCD_1998_to_2009.pdf http://www.caluniv.ac.in/academic/education_journal/12%20Inclusive%20Education%20attitude%20and%20problems%20as%20perceived%20by%20the%20secondary%20school%20students.pdf http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/001440290507100205 http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/002221948702000204 http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.2511/rpsd.23.4.289 http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0023/002324/232424e.pdf http://www.uis.unesco.org/Library/Documents/disabchild09-en.pdf

Bharati P. Sasane & Dr. Anita Belapurkar

GOOD PRACTICES: CASE STUDIES OF SUCCESSFUL INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 54/60

The persons are disabled as a result of mental, physical or sensory impairment. These individuals are often limited by both physical and social barrierswhich exclude them from society and prevent them from actively participatingin the development of their nations. This document providesguidelines and concepts for rendering National Education Plans / Education for All (EFA)more inclusive, with the objective of ensuring access and quality education for ALL learners.This paper is intended to systematize how excluded children are planned for in education.It begins with a brief introduction, which provides a historical perspective on theorigins of inclusion and describes the shift from integration towards inclusion. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Golhar Sandip Bhonjiba

INNOVATIVE APPROACHES TO PROMOTE HUMAN RIGHT EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 61/64

Summary – Human right refer to the fundamental freedoms and basic liberlives without which men, Women and children can not live with respect and dignity Human rights are the natural rights of a human being which means the right to quarantine dignity as a person . The universal declaration of human rights on December 1948. Marks the first corner stone of an international movement for human right 

,18,10,11,20,12,7,6,21,16,14,9,5,1,8,22,13,17,15,19

Mohanti Jaganath (200), Human Rights Education, New Delhi, Deep Publication Pvt. Ltd. Raghuvansh Sujata (2007) Human Rights and Duties Education, New Delhi Mahaveer and Sons Publication. http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Human rights http://www.un.org/en/documentsw/udher/ http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Human rights.

Mrs Ami Sharma

TEACHING EXPERIENCES IN THE INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 65/72

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Dr. Alka Lal

THE ROLE OF THE TEACHER IN INCLUSION SCHOOLS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 73/78

Although there is a wide spread belief for inclusion at all levels there are some concerns that the policy of inclusion is difficult to implement because teachers are not efficient to work in inclusive ways. Inclusion requires teacher to accept the responsibilities for creating schools in which all children whether students with learningdifficulties, special need students and normal student can learn in this task.Teachers are very important because of the central role they play in promoting participating and reducing under achievement particularly with children who might be perceived as having difficulties in learning. There are some barriers in the development of successful inclusive schools and suggest that one way of overcoming these  difficulties is to consider the roles , duties responsibilities and identities of the teacher . it also provide the role of the teacher in the development in the teachers skills, knowledge , attitude and beliefs. The details of the paper are provided  

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Work.chron.com www.brighthubeducation.com Drum.lib.umd.hu Inclusive Education Dr.UshaRao

Prof. (Mrs.) Kolekar Varsha Ramchandra

SUPPORT OF INCLUSION EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 79/86

 The research identifies a range of supportive task both inside and outside the classroom best teaching assistant establishing a positive and trusting relation with the pupil. To best serve the students in an inclusion classroom the teacher in that classroom need to have the appropriate support to create a more effective inclusion environment.It is important to identify the necessary compound of inclusion according to the individuals most Responsible for the education of these included students Teacher reported only modest support for inclusion. The most significant consideration that the Teacher feels “Supported” as they work to wordsinclusion of students with severe behavior disorders, support must become an entire community effort.

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

http:/www. European agency org or Www ride.rigov. eric. Ed. Govlid= E J84745 http:// www.Info.com A support

Dr. Ashwani

ROLE OF PANCHYATI RAJ IN SOCIAL INCLUSION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 87/93

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Bandyopadhyay, D., & Mukherjee, Amitava ¼2004).New Issues in Panchayati Raj.New Delhi: Concept Publishing Co. Gandhi, M.K. (Compiled by R.k. Prabhu 1959). Panchyati Raj. Ahmedabad: Navajivan Publishing House. Goel, S. L., & Rajneesh, Shalini ¼2003).Panchayati Raj in India, Theory and Practice. New Delhi: Deep & Deep Publications Pvt Ltd. Mishra, Anil Dutta ¼1998), “Decentralised Planning”, Uppal Publishing House, New Delhi. Prasad, R. R. &Rajnikanth, G. ¼2006).Rural Development and Social Change.Vol-I &Vol-II. New Delhi: Discovery Publishing House. Rajneesh, Shalini ¼2002). Rural Development through Democratic Decentralization.New Delhi: Deep & Deep Publications. Kaushik, Susheela ¼1993). Women and Panchayati Raj. New Delhi: Har-Anand publications.

Navsheen M. Shaikh

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION FORDYNAMIC AND EQUITABLE SOCIETIES

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 94/98

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

‘Education of Exceptional Children’- K.C.Panda Notes of Google.com Bhintipalikadlishala : Madhuri Deshpande

Mrs. Sangeeta Mehrotra

CHALLENGES, PROBLEMS AND CONSTRAINTS IN IMPLEMENTATION OF INCLUSION: INDIA CONCERN

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 99/106

 People all over world are working towards the eradication of illiteracy. This has given rise to principals like “Right to Education”. This means every individual has the right to get proper education. Inclusive Education is a concept of effective schools where every child has a place to study and teachers become facilitators of learning rather than providers of information. Inclusive education is a right –based approach to educating children and includes those who are subject to exclusionary pressures. Inclusion enables the students with disability to study in mainstream institutions. Various policies have been made by Indian Government since 1964 to enable the special children to study in normal schools. Inclusive education is a strategy contributing towards the ultimate goal of promoting an inclusive society, one which enables all children / adults, whatever their gender, age, ability, ethnicity, impairment or status, to participate in and contribute to the society.Inclusive education is a strategy contributing towards the ultimate goal of promoting an inclusive society, one which enables all children / adults, whatever their gender, age, ability, ethnicity, impairment or status, to participate in and contribute to the society. Studies and researches suggest that there are many barriers in implementing Inclusive  Education Program.

Keywords: Inclusive Education, disabilities, barriers

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Jyoti Narayan Parihar & Dr. Jyoti Bavane

BALASHAHYA BALKANCHE SHIKSHAN EK ABHYAS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 107/112

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Prof Archana Desai & Ms. Diptimayee Pradhan

CHALLENGES, PROBLEMS AND CONSTRAINTS FOR INCLUSIVE EDUCATION : INDIAN CONTEXT

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 113/119

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Ms. SighalNidhi, Educations of Children with Disabilities in India, efareport@unesco.org, 2009 .Dr. RaoIndumati, Inclusive Education in Indian Context, www.eenet.org.uk. Ms. Kohama Angela, Inclusive Education in India : A Country in Transition, www.pdfs.semanticscholar.org, June 2012 . Mr. Hodskinson Allan & Ms. DevarakondaChandrika, Conceptions of Inclusion & Inclusive Education, www.rie.sagepub.com , 2009 . Mr. Das Ajay Kumar & Mr. Sharma Umesh, Inclusive Education in India : Past, Present & Future, www.researchgate.net, Dec. 2016 Mr. Singh J.D., Inclusive Education in India : Concept, Need & Challenges, www.researchgate.net, Sept. 2016. Dr. YadavaShalini, Inclusive Education : Challenges & Prospects in India, www.confabjournals.uk, Mr. Murphy Philip, The Biggest Barriers to Inclusive Education, www.thinkinclusive.us, Sept. 2015.

Vidhyadevi Bhila Bagul, Dr. Sanjeevani R. Mahale & Sau. Sharmishta C. Aok

SAMAVESHIT SHIKSHNAT DIYANG VIDHYARTHYANSANTHI ANUBHAVI SHIKSHKANI KELELA PRAYATNA - EK VYASHTI ABHYAS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 120/130

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Prof. Namita S. Sahare

IMPLEMENTATION OF ROLE PLAY TO DEVELOP LIFE SKILLS IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 131/138

Inclusive education is about how we develop and design our schools, classrooms, programs and activities so that all students learn and participate together. Students in inclusive classroom are at risk because they lack social support to seek accurate information and interaction.  Thus providing an experience that would strengthen student’s coping abilities to counter environmental stress and disadvantages with which they sometimes have to cope with while experiencing is an essential need. The purpose of this study is primarily to study the impact of role play to develop life skills in inclusive classroom. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Amutha Sr. P.Servite College of Education, Karur TN: Effectiveness of Role play technique in enhancing the achievement of XI std. students in Economic Zoology. Bandura, A. (1977). Social Learning Theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.. Edu Tracks Vol 14 April 2015 Neelkamal Publications Pvt Ltd. Koti. Hyderabad. Oh Mind Relax Please – by Swami Sukhabodhananda, Tenth edition 2002, published by Prasanna Trust Bangalore. Putnam, J. W. (1998). The process of cooperative learning. In J. W. Putnam (Ed.), Cooperative learning and strategies for inclusion: Celebrating diversity in the classroom (pp. 17-47). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes. Stress Management – by Radheshyam Das, M. Tech, IIT Mumbai , 2nd ed. Nov 2011 ©VOICE Pune. The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People – by Stephen R Covey , Pocket Books, 1999, An imprint of Simon and Schuster UK Ltd, A via company www.buzzle.com www.jaicobooks.com http://medind.nic.in http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Madhuri Atul Gunjal

STUDY OF AWARENESS ABOUT SEGREGATED EDUCATION, INTEGRATED EDUCATION AND INCLUSIVE EDUCATION AMONG SCHOOL TEACHERS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 139/151


From the constitution to the Kothari Commission in the early days of the republic, to the 2005 Action Plan for Children and Youth with Disabilities and the 2006 National Policy for People with Disabilities recently, the Indian government tends to write inclusive policies on education. The progress in governmental policies that point towards efforts of inclusion in mainstream education in India. However, the current statistics and literature point to an entirely different situation on the ground. There are several areas across which people with disabilities receive unequal services in India. Out of such services, Education is an important area which is helpful to make disabled ones educated, skilled, to make aware social realities and for their rehabilitation. Simultaneously, teachers play an important role in the implementation of three models of special education, i.e., segregated, integrated and inclusive education. Therefore, to know about the awareness among school teachers regarding these three models of special education, researcher decided to undertake a survey study. The purpose of the study was to know about awareness regarding segregated, integrated and inclusive education among school teachers. The study included use of opinionnaire for data collection from one hundred and twenty-six teachers from eighteen different schools.

Keywords-Segregated Education, Integrated Education, Inclusive Education and School Teachers 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

‘Fact Sheet on Persons with Disabilities’, UN Enable, The United Nations, from http://www.un.org/disabilities/documents/toolaction/pwdfs.pdf as retrieved on 20 Jan. 2017. ‘Inclusive Education in India: A Country in Transition’, fromhttp://intldept.uoregon.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/INTL-UG-ThesisKohama.pdf as retrieved on 22 Jan. 2017. ‘Integration is not Inclusion’, The Alliance for Inclusive Education, fromhttp://www.allfie.org.uk/pages/useful%20info/integration.html as retrieved on 22 Jan. 2017. ‘Making Schools Inclusive: How Change can Happen’, Save the Children UK, fromhttp://www.eenet.org.uk/resources/docs/Making%20schools%20inclusive%20SCUK.pdf as retrieved on 24 Jan. 2017. Vijayan&Geetha (2006) Integrated and Inclusive Education, Rehabilitation Council of India in association with Kanishka Publishers, New Delhi. Koul, Lokesh (2013) Methodology of Educational Research, Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/segregated http://www.allfie.org.uk/pages/useful%20info/integration.html http://bardhaman.nic.in/education/ssa/study_11.pdf http://nummarius.com/The_Attitude_of_Teachers_on_Inclusion.pdf

Amita Shashikant Dambir & Dr. Aruna Bhmbare

APANG KALYANKARI SHIKSHAN SANSTHA V SANSHODHAN KENDRACHA ABHYAS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 152/156

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Dr. Sunita G Hiremath

A COMPARATIVE STATUS STUDY OF PRE SERVICE TEACHER AND IN SERVICE TEACHER ATTITUDE TOWARDS THE INCLUSION EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 157/159

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Aggrawal, Y.P. (1990), Statistical methods, concepts, applications and computations. New Delhi. Sterling .Publishers Pvt Ltd. Best, J.W., & Kahn, J.V. (2009). Research in Education, New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India. Mondal, A. & Mete, J. (2012). Inclusive Education: Paradigm Shift in Education for Children with Special Needs in India. In Kumar. T. Pradeep (Eds.), Innovative Trends in Education. New Delhi : APH Publishing Corporation Jayanta Mete & Ajit mondal (2014). Education for all. S.B Nangia, APH Publishing Corporation New Delhi.

Dr. Nisha Valvi & Dr.Sanjeev Sonawane

ATTITUDE OF PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS TOWARDSINCLUSIVE EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 160/165

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Anita Kumar Dhaigude

TO STUDY THE PROBLEMS OF ADIVASI STUDENTS WHILE INCLUSION IN INCLUSIVE SCHOOL

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 166/169

Inclusive Education is a new concept. Inclusive education means different and diverse students learning side by side in the same class room. The concept of Integrated Education and Education for the disable is being adopted all over the world. The gap between general education and Education for disabled started increasing and its tremendous effect were seen. And  to cope with this the concept of Inclusive Education came into existence. The main purpose of this research is to bring the tribal class students into mainstream and educate them.As education is the only key to advancement. And deprivation of Education is usually associated with poverty and other major problems. Adivasis are major part of the population which is backward. And to diminish this rift between them and the society Education is important.  The purpose of this research is to find the problems faced by adivasi students even after the implementation of Right To Education act 2009. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Best John and Kahn James,(2007)’Research in Education’(X Edition),New Delhi : PHI learning Pvt.Ltd Joseph A.Maxwell, ’A realist Approach For Qualitative Research’, California : SAGE Publication. KaulLokesh, “Methodology of Educational Research’(III Edition), Noida :Vikas Publishing House Pvt Ltd. ejkBhiqLrds ckscMsizdk’k ] ¼2011½ Hkkjrh; lektjpukvkSjaxkckn % ve`rkizdk’ku- xkjsxksfoan ]¼1991½vkfnoklhaP;kleL;kfopkjvkf.kfo’ys”k.kvkfnoklh ] ukf’kdlektfoKkuizdk’ku- xkjsxksafon] ¼1994½ vkfnoklhiz’uvkf.kifjorZuvkSjaxkckn% ve`rkizdk’ku dsrdj ,l-Ogh- ¼1909½ Hkkjrkthytkrhapkbfrgkl %U;;kWdZ

Prof. Kamble Rahul Baliram & Dr. Bhadane Krishana Punjaram

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 170/175

Inclusion in education is an approach to educating students with special educational needs. Under the inclusion model, students with special needs spend most or all of their time with non-special needs students. Inclusion rejects the use of special schools or classrooms to separate students with disabilities from students without disabilities.Implementation of these practices varies. Schools most frequently use the inclusion model for selected students with mild to moderate special needs. Fully inclusive schools, which are rare, do not separate "general education" and "special education" programs; instead, the school is restructured so that all students learn together. Inclusive education differs from the \'integration\' or \'mainstreaming\' model of education, which tended to be concerned principally with disability and special educational needs, and learners changing or becoming \'ready for\' or deserving of accommodation by the mainstream. A premium is placed upon full participation by students with disabilities and upon respect for their social, civil, and educational rights. Feeling included is not limited to physical and cognitive disabilities, but also includes the full range of human diversity with respect to ability, language, culture, gender, age and of other forms of human differences 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Baglieri, S., & Shapiro, A. (2012). Disability Studies and the Inclusive Classroom. New York, NY: Routledge. Biklen, D.2000. Constructing inclusion: Lessons from critical, disability narratives.International Journal on Inclusive Education, 4(4):337 –353. Biklen, D., & Burke, J. (2006).Presuming competence. Equity & Excellence in Education, 39, 166-175. Connor, D. (2006). Michael's Story: "I get into so much trouble just by walking":Narrative knowing and life at the intersections of learning disability, race,and class. Equity & Excellence in Education, 39, 154-165. Davis, L. J. (2010). Constructing normalcy. In L. J. Davis (Ed.), The Disability Studies Reader. (3rd ed.) (pp. 9–28). New York: Routledge. Erevelles, N. (2011). "Coming out Crip" in inclusive education. Teachers College Record, 113 (10). Retrieved from http://www.tcrecord.org Id Number: 16429 Graham, L., &Slee, R. (2007). An illusory interiority: Interrogating the discourse/s of inclusion. Educational Philosophy and Theory, 40, 277-293.

Dr. Bhausaheb Sopan Andhale

SAMAVESHAK SHIKSHAN

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 176/181

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

www.inclusiveschools.org www.inclusionbc.org/.../inclusive-educ

Dr. Atul Arun Gaikwad

ROLE OF CONSTITUTIONAL PROVISIONS AND ITS APPLICATION IN INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 182/186

Inclusive Education menace normal Students and abnormal students are learning together at one place, There are 12 major Constitutional provisions belongs to education. How it works for Inclusive education, Hoe they apply for Inclusive Education, Effects of such provision on Inclusive Education itexplain in this paper. It belongs to 1 Free and Compulsory Education, 2 Education of Minorities,3 Language Safeguards, 4 Education for WeakerSections, 5 Secular Education, 6 Equality of Opportunity in Educational Institutions,7 Instruction in Mother -Tongue: 8 Promotion of Hindi 9 Higher Education and Research, 10Women’s Education, 11 Education in the Union Territories: 12 Educational and cultural relations with foreign countries. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Constitutional Provisions Regarding Education in India Constitutional Provisions Regarding Right to Education in India The Union Territories of India: it’s Constitutional Provisions Constitutional Provisions for Social Reforms in India Constitutional Provisions of the Scheduled and Tribal Areas of India Education and Closed Society Situation after Independence in India Essay on the Constitutional Concept of Scheduled Tribe Who Constitute Minorities in India? The Meaning of Breakdown of Constitutional Machinery in India

Safiya Mulla & Dr.Vishnu M.Shinde

A STUDY OF AWARNESS AND APPLICATION OF INCLUSIVE EDUCATION AMONG SCHOOL TEACHERS OF VIJAYAPUR CITY

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 187/191


The objective of the present study is to investigate the awareness and application of Inclusive education among school teachers of Vijayapur city. The sample of the study comprised 60 teachers randomly selected from various schools of Vijayapur city. The study reveals that the teachers are aware about Inclusive Education but there is lack of implementation. The study suggests special training for school teacher to practice Inclusive education.

Keywords: Inclusive Education, application, awareness, school teachers 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Anke De Boer (2011): Regular Primary school Teacher’s attitude towards Inclusive Education: A Review of the literature, Vol 15, Issue 3, pg 331 -353. AlkaArora (2015) : Inclusive education in India: How and Why?, Journal of Disabilities Studies, Volume 1, Issue 1, pg 31-34 Christina Tilstone (2003): Strategies to promote Inclusive practice, Publishing – RouttedgeFalmer, London. David Skidmore (2004): Inclusion: The Dynamic of school Development Open University Press, Buckingham. Dr.KumarSanjeev (2007): Inclusive education in India, Electronic Journal for Inclusive Education, Vol 2, Issue 2. Gary Thomas (2001): The making of the Inclusive School, RouttedgeFalmer, London. J.D.Singh (2016): Inclusive Education in India – Concept, Need and Challenges, Scholarly Research Journal for Humanity Science and English Language,Vol 3,Issue 13, pg 3222 – 3232. Lani Florian (2008): Inclusion- Special or Inclusive education: Future Trends, British Journal of Special Education,Vol 35,Issue 4, pg 202 – 208. Richard.A.Villa (2005): Creating an Inclusive School, Publisher: Association for Supervision and Development. Sip Jan Pijl (1997): Inclusive Education: A Global Agenda, Roultedge, London. Spasovski,Ognen (2010): Principles of the Inclusive Education and the role of teachers and in school professional staff ,The Journal of special education and rehabilitation,vol.11,no 1.

Smt. Nanda Brij Pande & Dr. Satish Shirsath

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION FOR ALL (RURAL AREA)

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 192/0

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Aanchal Verma

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION LAYS THE FOUNDATION OF SOCIAL INTEGRATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 193/199


Social integration is a highly desirable outcome that reflects the existence of social cohesion, a strong institutional foundation and a culture of acceptance. Societies are better off if they promote social integration through inclusive policies that reduce economic inequality and poverty, and promote sustainable and equitable development (Maria Amparo Cruz-Saco, 2008).Inclusive education is educating ALL students in age-appropriate generaleducation classes in their neighbourhood schools, with high quality instruction, interventions and supports so all students can be successful in the core curriculum. Inclusive schools have a collaborative and respectful school culture where students with disabilities are presumed to be competent, develop positive social relationships with peers, and are fully participating members of the school community. According to the NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND ACT (NCLB) of 2001, all children should obtain a high  quality education as per the standard age and to attain the improvement in achievement, the schools of now a days are putting immense pressure on teachers which in turn is reflected on the students. In these circumstances Inclusion is a difficult task to achieve and follow. Regular classrooms with students with different abilities help in building tolerance and acceptance. Inclusion promotes social integration and togetherness where ALL are accepted as they are.Inclusive education lays the foundation of social integration which leads to the foundation of inclusive societies.

Keywords: Social cohesion, Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act (1991), No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB),  Least Restrictive Environment (LRE), Inclusion, Social exclusion, Special Educational Needs (SEN) Students 

,18,10,11,20,12,7,6,21,16,14,9,5,1,8,22,13,17,15,19

Creating an Inclusive Society:Practical Strategies to Promote Social Integration, DESA 2009 http://www.integrationandcohesion.org.uk/Our_final_report.aspx Inclusive Education Research & Practice Xuan Bui, Carol Quirk, Selene Almazan, Michele Valenti, Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education, 2010 Reasearch on Inclusive Educational programs, practices and outcomes for students with severe disabilities, Pam Hunt, Lori Goetz, The journalof special education vol. 31/NO.1/1997/pp. 3-29 A case for inclusive education, Gilian Parekh, RA,February 2013. Educating students with learning disabilities in Inclusive classrooms, Jeremy Ford, Electronic journal for inclusive education, Vol. 3, 2013. Inclusive Education: the benefits and the obstacles, Nicole M. McMillan, 2008. Promoting Social Integration: Economic, Social and Political Dimensions with a focus on Latin America (first draft – 07-02-08),MariaAmparo Cruz-Saco Economics Connecticut College, USA, 2008. Inclusive Education for social transformation, SusilaMarimuthu, LohSau Cheong, Procedia-Social and Behavioural sciences 172 (2015) 317-322. Inclusion and pupil achievement , Alan Dyson, Peter Farrell, FilizPolat and Graeme Hutcheson ,2008.

Mr.Sandip D. Gadekar & Dr. Bhushan Patil

TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT FOR TEACHER EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 200/205

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Edward Sallis, (2002), Total Quality Management in Education, USA, stylus pub.pp-21 S.Venkataiah (2004) Quality Education, New Delhi, Anmol Publication pvt.ltd. Sailendra Nigam, Total quality management – Excellbooks , New Delhi. PatilBhushan&GadekarSandip D.,( Feb 2013), Total Quality Management for Teacher Training Colleges SRJIS/SPECIAL ISSUE /NATIONAL LEVEL SEMINAR /ISSN: 2278-8808 PatilBhushan&GadekarSandip D.,( Jan. 2014), Total Quality Management forTeacher Training Colleges RESEARCH FRONT/ Special Issue No. 1- Jan. 2014/ISSN: (Print) 2320 – 6446, (Online) 2320 – 8341 GadekarSandip D.,(Feb.2016),TQM PHILOSOPHY FOR FUTURE OF HIGHER EDUCATION/ International Conference Tilak College Of Education, Pune. https://www.google.co.in/The14pointsofDr.W.EdwardsDeming

Dr. Asawari Bhave Gudipudi & Dr. Asha Latha Nelli

CREATING AN INCLUSIVE ENVIRONMENT

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 206/212

 The purpose of education is to ensure that all students gain access to knowledge, skills, and information that will prepare them to contribute to immediate community and the society.  The central purpose becomes more challenging as schools accommodate students with increasingly diverse backgrounds and abilities. Inclusion is an educational approach and philosophy that provides all students with community membership and greater opportunities for academic and social achievement.  Inclusion is about making sure that each and every student feels welcome and that their unique needs and learning styles are attended to and valued. India being a multicultural country, Indian classrooms are multicultural in nature. The problems happening in the society are reflected in the classrooms too. Children are likely to face bias, prejudice and feeling of disrespect and unwelcome environment in the classroom. Creating an inclusive environment is necessary to make every student welcome in the school and the classroom.

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

http://nvpie.org/inclusive.html http://www.safeatschool.ca/plm/equity-and-inclusion/personal-reflection-exercises https://www.unicef.org/education/files/Equity_and_Inclusion_Guide.pdf http://www.understandingprejudice.org/teach/elemtips.htm

Prof. Kamthe Avinash Jayshing

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: RATIONALE AND DEVELOPMENTS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 213/219

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Prof. Kale Sambhaji Rangrao

CHALLENGES FOR POLICY-MAKERS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 220/226

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Prof. Prachi Tambe

INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS PRACTICES

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 227/229

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Afreen Shaikh & Dr. Bhushan Patil

A STUDY OF ATTITUDE OF SCHOOL STUDENTS TOWARDS INCLUSIVE EDUCATION IN AN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL IN PUNE

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 230/236

We keep speaking of ingraining in our future generation the 21st Century skills and making them dynamic leaders of tomorrow but there are some qualities which stand of greater importance. These are building in them compassion for one another, helpfulness, humility and empathy which make them better social beings. The researcher through the current study focuses on how these traits become characteristics of normal students when placed in inclusion with students with special needs. A survey is conducted among 30 Seventh Grade students of a well known international school where students are already briefed by their teachers about needs of special children and importance of having them in their class. The students in the survey come from families with good financial background and parents of these children are concerned about a good overall upbringing of their children who spend maximum time in the school. Teachers and educators of the school play a key role in influencing the attitude of the students as the way they would respond to the acceptability to special children in their class so would the other students. The findings of the study show that qualities of compassion, helpfulness, responsibility empathy and social acceptance of special children are a byproduct when placed in inclusion in a positive classroom environment. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Dr. Dhananjay Lokhande & Sunil Dabhade

EDUCATION AND SOCIAL CHANGE: ISSUES AND CHALLENGES

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 237/0

\"\"The Importance of Education is the development and progress of human being. It is also a master key to open an overall transformation of a society, it helps to cultivate knowledge, information, skills and values appropriate to the changing socio-economic and political structure. Education can play important role as a single remedy for the settlement of several socio-economic problems, like poverty, inequality, unemployment. Social change can be occurred by natural or by the planned effort.  Social change can be different in place or nature. Social change is continuous process. Through the Indian Constitution the education facilities for the weaker section like Scheduled Caste, Scheduled Tribes, Other backward class, Minority, Women providing reservation and scholarshipcan improved their capacity building.Education at various levels formal or non-formal, is a major tool for economic changes that would lead to the upliftment of a person. It reduces the economic inequalities existed in the society and leads the development of primary, secondary and tertiary sectors. Education gives much more stress on human development.  Educationalso produces social changes in making the people conscious of their rights, enabling them to fight against various social evils. It also has interlinks with social policy variables like family, health, nutrition, status of women, life expectancy and social awareness. Present paper deals with education for weaker section through the education how the social change will occur in society.

Keywords-Education, Social Change, SC, ST, OBC, Minority, Upliftment, Constitutional Safeguard Social Development 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Rizwana Daulatabad

ASHRAYA INITIATIVE FOR CHILDREN: A LEAP TOWARDS INCLUSION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 238/245

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Dash,B.N (2005)Teacher and Education in the Emerging Indian Society,Hyderabad:neelkamal publications. National Commission for Denotified,Nomadic and Semi-nomadic Tribes(Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment. www.ashrayainitiative./org/ www.shodganga.inflibnet.ac.in

Meenakshi Vandana

TEACHING SCIENCE TO VISUALLY IMPAIRED STUDENTS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 246/252

 Sciencesubject have abstract concepts. Traditional science teaching has been depended mostly on visual instruction.Hurdles arisefor visually impaired (VI) or partially sighted students in inclusive classroom to understand samescience concepts with sighted students. VI students adapt to use multi sensory approach to learn using such as tactile and aural.Teacher   for VI should implement instructionalstrategies for science teaching to VI students. .aim of this study is to explore the acquisition of instructional strategies by employing a qualitative approach. The findings of the data were acquired by means of questionnaire circulated among visually-impaired students, as well as an interview with an instructor who has experience in teaching visually-impaired students. The findings indicate that the students face difficulties in biology, physics and chemistry being the most challenging.

PURPOSE:Purpose of this study was to investigate how VI students understand abstract sciencecontent at secondary level in inclusive classroom.

Key words: visually impaired; science teaching;, instructionalstrategies

,18,10,11,20,12,7,6,21,16,14,9,5,1,8,22,13,17,15,19

soni,(2001) Attitude towards integrated education ,New Delhi,Rajat publication Disabled Persons in India. NSS 58th Round (July – December 2002), Report No. 485, National SampleSurvey Organization, Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation, Government of India,New Delhi, December 2003 Pandey, R.S. and Advani, L. Perspectives in Disability andRehabilitation.Vikas Publication, New Delhi, 1995. Evangeline (2006) Survey of Teacher Attitude Regarding Inclusive Education Within an Urban School District "Access & Technology: Making Science Accessible to Blind Students" by Marc Krizack, Disability World. "Adapting Science for Students with Visual Impairments – A Handbook for the Classroom Teacher and Teacher of the Visually Impaired” American Printing House for the Blind. Fennell,F.&Rowan,T.(2001).Representation :An important process for teaching and learning mathematics. Jones, J., Curriculum Process in School and University Physics. J. Curro Studies Pace, D. (2003). Increasing awareness and understanding of students with disabilities Peetsma, T. (2001). Inclusion in Education: Comparing pupil's development in special and regular education Strategies for teaching students with visually impaired http// www.as.wvu.edu/-scidis/vision.html. American foundation for blind :http//www.afb.org http://www.disabilityworld.org/June-July2000/access/Science.html “Feeling the Chemistry”, by Scott Roark, Cal Poly Magazine Online http://www.calpolynews.calpoly.edu/magazine/fall-07/Chemistry.html

Dr. Kaluram Nathu Bhise

CHALLENGES, PROBLEMS AND CONSTRAINTS IN IMPLEMENTATION OF INCLUSION: INDIA CONCERN

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 253/257

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Das, Kartick.(2013): Inclusive Education in India. Delhi: The Associated Publishers. Prasad, S.,(2004): Special Education. Jaipur:Pointer Publishers. Sangolkar,A,(2011): New Emerging Issues in Society.Nashk: Insight Publications. 4.Umadevi,M.,(2010): Special Education. New Delhi:Neelkamal Publications.

Sushma Nangude & Sunil Tejwani

ADMINISTRATIVE BACKGROUND AND AN OVERVIEW OF FACILITIES PROVIDED BY RASHTRIYA MADHYAMIK SHIKSHA ABHIYAN (RMSA) TO CHILD WITH SPECIAL NEED (CWSN) UNDER THE MAHATMA FULE QUALITY ENHANCEMENT PROGRAMME

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 258/266

 This article throws light on Administrative Background and an basic facilities provided by Rashtriya Madhyamik Shiksha  Abhiyan (RMSA) to Child with Special Need (CWSN) under the Mahatma Fule Quality Enhancement Programme implemented by The School Education and Sports Department of the state. Very few teachers are train how to use these facilities to make our class inclusive. In regular school teachers have no idea of how to use inclusive facilities, kits and tools. Even most of the teachers are unable to tell what kind of aid will prove helpful to particular special child. Vast and lengthy information of Inclusive kits and facilities are easily available on internet to read. But lengthy and descriptive information may wastes time. To search it separately will become a time consuming and rigorous task.  ArticIe provides basic information of inclusive tool  ,it’s usage and How to use the tool in the classrooms with suggested ways to include child in day today class room situations. It definitely help teachers to understand the basics of Inclusion. Teachers can use it as an usage guide at school level. Bird eye view of Basic knowledge of facilities ,tools  and kits provided will boost confidence of teachers. Because of prior knowledge teacher can demand facilities from Government without hesitation as this article presents contracted, precise and scientific information of facilities provided by Government to child with special need (CWSN). Indirectly It will serve as Compact information of various tools at one click .

Keywords: Child with Special Needs, Overview, Inclusive facilities-tools-kits

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

“Use of Smart Wheelchairs” to provide Independent Mobility to visual & mobility Impairments, http://clinicaltrials.gov “How Braille began” http://www.brailler.com “How Braille began” http://www.brailler.com

Rogangar Bushra Altaf

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: INNOVATIVE TECHNIQUES

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 267/274

Inclusive classrooms are better suited to meet the needs of students with disabilities. “Inclusive education is a system that permits students with disabilities to be educated in neighborhood schools in age-appropriate regular classroom settings with non-disabled peers” (OECD, 1997 p55). Inclusive education benefits the student in three separate areas. Special education students have been proven to show drastic increases in academic skills, social skills, and psychological ability. The main reason for this is that children learn an enormous amount from each other that they can not learn from the adults in their everyday lives (Galis, Linscott& Tanner, 1996). School teams spend precious time creating the foundations of inclusive programs for students with disabilities. Careful thought goes into scheduling co-taught classes, creating balanced classroom rosters, training co-teaching partners, developing collaborative relationships, and providing appropriate supports for students with disabilities (Walther-Thomas, Korinek, McLaughlin, & Williams, 2000). 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Dakar Framework for Action – Education for All, meeting our collective commitment. On Internet:http://www2.unesco.org/wef/enconf/ dakframeng.shtm Karten, T. (2010). Inclusion strategies that work! Research-based methods for the classroom (2nd ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press A new guide on increasing inclusivity in the classroom.Vanderbilt University.Center for Teaching. cft.vanderbilt.edu/2014/11/a-new-guide-on-increasing-inclusivity-in-the-classroom/ Mastropieri, M. A., & Scruggs, T. E. (2004). The inclusive classroom: Strategies for effective instruction. NY: Pearson.

Preeti Shah & Prof. Shaheen Ansari

BRIDGING INCLUSION WITH PRE PRIMARY EDUCATION IN INDIA

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 275/284

This paper is intended to suggest how excluded children can be brought in education in the early years of their life. It begins with a brief introduction, which provides importance of Early childhood development, importance of inclusion and describes how they both go hand in hand and contribute to the all-round development of a child. It also suggests what practical changes at the preprimary level can be brought about to ensure social equity. These guidelines are intended to provide information and awareness, to be a policy tool for revising and formulating plans, and to serve as a basis for discussion among policymakers, educators, NGOs and international organizations impacting policy in both private and public Pre- school education and concerned with promoting access for ALL learners. The theme presented is also the area of work of UNESCO, UNICEF, and SAVE THE CHILDREN. These guidelines attempt to demystify the notions surrounding inclusion and demonstrate that challenges can be overcome through a willingness to change attitudes regarding inclusion. By following these guidelines, those working with and analyzing National Plans for Education can identify gaps and strategies in order to take steps to ensure that inclusion is achieved within their educational systems and that every child has access to a quality education.


































Keywords:  Inclusion, Early Childhood development, Pre Primary, UNESCO, UNICEF, SAVE THE CHILDREN 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Bernard, A, Education for All and Children who are Excluded.Education for All 2000 Assessment. Thematic Studies, 2000 EFA Global Monitoring Report, The Quality Imperative, 2005 Inclusive Pre-Primary Education – Project Plan, November 2014 Inclusive Pre-Primary Education (Ippe) Project: Conceptual Framework,2015 Kumar.R, Challenges In Elementary /Pre Primary Education And Probable Solutions Without Any Special Budget Making Schools Inclusive (2008),Save the Children, London Theis, Joachim (2003) Rights-based Approach to Education, Save the Children, Sweden https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_Development_Index http://indicators.report/indicators/i-32 https://www.mygov.in http://www.norrag.org https://www.unicef.org/earlychildhood/index en.unesco.org savethechildren.org.uk www.inshea.fr

Pushpa Patole

KARN BADHIR VIDHYARTHYANSATHI SANGANAK SAHAYIT ANUDESHAN KARYKRAM NIRMITICHYA PARINAMKARKTECHA ABHYAS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 285/293

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Tasneem Bano

PREPARING TEACHERS FOR INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 294/298


Inclusive Education is a new concept towards educating the children with disability &learning difficulties with that of normal ones within the same roof .it brings all students together in one classroom &community, regardless of their strengths or weakness in any area,& seeks to maximize the potential of all students .it is one of the most effective ways in which to promote an inclusive & tolerant society. What is the current staff structure of our country’s education system,Do the regular Pre-Service teacher training curricula provide essential knowledge &skills with diverse needs ?What are the current policies in the country to support  both education staff & children with disabilities. Keeping in view these questions, this article discuss in detail the concept of Inclusive education ,Attitudnal changes & awareness raising Activities among classroom teachers,Kewy teachers ,school principals & policy makers.

Keywords: Inclusive Education,Inclusivedisabilities,Pre-Service,In-service training program,Key teachers. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Branllinger, E. (1996). Inflence of pre-service etchersbeliefs about Pupil achievement on attitudes towards inclusion. Teacher Education and Special Education 19(1), 17-33 Kilgore.K.L. and Griffin, C.C. (1908).Beginning Special Educator: Problems of Practice and the influence of School context.Teacher Education and Special Education 21 (3) 155-73. Lombardi, T.P. &Hunka N.J. (2001).Preparing General Education Teachers for Inclusive Classroom Assessing the process.Teacher Education and Special Education 24(3) 183-97. Peters; S.J. (2004). Inclusive Education : An Education for All Strategy for all children. Washington DC. World Bank. Stayton, V.D. &McCollum, J (2002). Unifying general and special education; what does the researcher tell us? Teacher Education and Special Education 25 (3): 211-18

Shri Jadhav Ramakant Shrihari

APANG MULANCHE MULYAMAPAN

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 299/306

 

,18,10,11,20,12,7,6,21,16,14,9,5,1,8,22,13,17,15,19

Prof. Rahul Samadhan Wankhede

A SHORT VIEW OF INCLUSIVE EDUCATION IN PRESENT CONTEXT

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 307/310

Education is the most important thing in man’s life. Education makes man as a socially cultural and civilized animal. Education makes him socially aware about his fellow men. Education teaches how to behave with others. Education is the fundamental right of every human being. It is said that if the child is unable to come to school, the school should go to him. Every individual , though he is from grassroots  level, should get education. No one can differentiate education on the basis of man and woman, boy and girl or any physical disability. Therefore the new concept of inclusive education has come ahead. Inclusive Education is a new law and concept of educational philosophy. Inclusive Education firstly discussed in 1970 on international level. The first conference which was held in Jomaciam in Thyland in 1990, discussed the concept of inclusive education. And in 1994 it was finally accepted in the conference of Salamanca in Spain. So in this paper it has been discussed briefly the Inclusive Education in present context. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Sharma,Y. K. Sharma Madhulika, “Inclusive Education: Planning And Management Of Curriculum”(2014) Kanishka Publisher, New Delhi Dr.BhangaleShailja, “ SamaveshakShikshan”(2016), Prashant Publication Jalgaon

Dr. Murade Balu Sakharam

SWAMAGN MULANCHYA SAMSYA ANI UPAYYOJANA

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 311/315

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Dr. Vaishali Shinde

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION IN INDIA

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 316/320

The present paper focuses on meaning of inclusive Education, Definition of   Inclusive education.Education in India is Primarily the responsibility of the State governments, Policy Framework,Education of persons withDisabilities Act 1995 talks aboutEqual Opportunities,Protection of Rights and Full Participation.Presidency Government gave financial aids and other assistance to institutions. Sargent Report emphasizes thatprovisions for the handicapped was to form an essential part of the national system of education,The act IEDC-1974  talks about Integrated Educationof the Disabled Children,It says that disabled children should be integrated in the main stream ofeducation.National Policy of Education-1986-recommended integrated education in general schools for children with locomotor handicaps and other mild disabilities, The present paper throws light onRehabilitation Council of India(RCI) Act,1992,Persons with Disabilities(Equal Opportunities,protection of Rights and Full Participation),The National Council For Educational Research and training preparation courses for special education,Distance education and open learning system of the National Open school as also the Indira Gandhi National Open University to provide school level education and higher vocational education and training to persons with disabilities. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

RaoUsha,(2012) Inclusive Education,Himalaya Publishing House,New Delhi. MustafaK.M.,(2016)InclusiveEducation,A.P.H.Publishingcorporation,New Delhi. Hallahan,D.P.,andKauftman,J.K.(1988) Exceptional children, Introduction to special Education,N.J.Englewood cliffs. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov www.somsd.k12.nj.us/cms/lib7/NJ10011050/Centricity/Inclusion/spring2014

Amruta Prabhu, Dr. Mukulira Olivier & Dr. Megha Uplane

USE OF ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY IN CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT TO ACHIEVE INCLUSIVE EDUCATION AND THE CHALLENGES FACED THEREIN

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 321/331

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

and synthesis of literature. Journal of Special Education Technology, 21, 47-56. Ashton, T., Lee, Y., & Vega, L. A. (2005). Assistive technology: Perceived knowledge, attitudes, and challenges of AT use in special education. Journal of Special EducationTechnology, 20, 60-63. Assistive Technology Act. (2004). Putting technology into the hands of individuals withdisabilities. [Online] Available:http://republicans.edlabor.house.gov/archive/issues/108th/education/at/billsummary.htm Ahmad, FouziaKhursheed (2014): "Assistive Provisions for the Education of Students with Learning Disabilities in Delhi Schools." International Journal of Fundamental and Applied Research, vol.2, no 9.pp.9-16. Ahmad, FouziaKhursheed (2015a): "Challenging Exclusion: Issues and Concerns in Inclusive Education in India." Researchpaedia, vol.2, no.1, pp.15-32. Baek, Y., Jung, J., & Kim, B. (2008). What makes teachers use technology in the classroom? Computers and Education, 50, 224-234. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2006.05.002 Bowser, G., & Reed, P. (1995). Education TECH points for assistive technology planning. Journal of Special Education Technology, 12, 325-338 Bryant, D. P., & Bryant, B. R. (1998). Using assistive technology to include students with learning disabilities in cooperative learning activities.Journal of Learning Disabilities, 31, 41-54. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/002221949803100105

Prof. Shaikh Heena Galib & Prof. Mohammed Fazil Shareef

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION IN INDIA: INTERPRETATION, IMPLEMENTATION, AND ISSUES

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 332/338

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

www.tandfonline.com www.researchgate.net www.eric.ed.gov www.eenet.org.uk www.corescholar.libraries.wright.edu www.thehindu.com www.create-rpc.org

Ashwini Jagannath Mahamuni

RECASTING SCHOOL EDUCATION TOWARDS INCLUSION - “A STUDY OF SYMBIOSIS INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL- PASTORAL CARE”

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 339/343

Inclusion is the need of the hour. Schools providing opportunities for inclusion will probably serves towards quality education. It involves regular schools with specific adoption to deal needs of all children together. For successful & effective inclusion, there is need of special environment creation & skills to adopt that culture with the help of assistive technologies in support to fulfill requirements of all children under one roof. In India, though it took time to accept inclusion by all means, some of the schools trying their level best to accommodate all children with diverse needs in better ways. Symbiosis International School is leading all the way to be the best to facilitate education with different ways. It aims at imparting education with befitting practices. It also promotes a Sanskrit Phrase “VasudhaivaKutumbakam”, which means “the world is one family”. With this view, researcher studied about “Symbiosis International School- Pastoral Care” Vimannagar, Pune, [Maharashtra (India)] to find out scenario of Inclusive Education Practices in their way. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Bauer, A. M., & Shea, T. M. (1999).Inclusion 101: How To Teach All Learners. Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co., PO Box 10624, Baltimore, MD 21285-0624. Retrieved on 27thjan 2017 from https://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED432843 Lipsky, D. K., & Gartner, A. (1997). Inclusion and School Reform: Transforming America's Classrooms. Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co., PO Box 10624, Baltimore, Maryland.Retrieved on 27th Jan 2017 from https://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED410723 Schools, I. (2004).Alternatives to overreliance on paraprofessionals in inclusive schools.Journal of Special Education Leadership, 17(2), 82. Retrieved on 27th Jan 2017 from https://www.gvsu.edu/cms4/asset/64CB422A-ED08-43F0F795CA9DE364B6BE/ alternatives_to_paras.pdf http://symbiosisinternationalschool.net/final_site/pastoral-care.html

Prof. Savita Shinde

INNOVATIVE APPROACHES TO PROMOTE EDUCATION FOR ALLINNOVATIVE CLASS ROOM METHODS AND STRATEGIES TO PROMOTE EDUCATION FOR ALL

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 344/351

In the fast changing world of the early 21st century public education is also changing. As part of the changes the role of schools and education will also be different in the educational system.  These are changes in teaching methods.  It can include changes in:

–      where you teach,

–      who teaches

–      how you teach

–      how the student can respond

–      Materials you use.

As a system, inclusive education should be flexible. Its principle should be education in the regular classroom whenever possible. This need for flexibility must be reflected in the methods and materials used to give these children the widest possible access to the regular curriculum. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Aggarwal, J.C (1985) Development and Planning of Modern Education, Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi. Aggarwal, J.C (1988) Teachers Role, Status, Service Conditions and Education in India, Vikas Publishing House Pvt Ltd., New Delhi https://www.quora.com https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/disabilities/

M. Irfan & Rashmina Irfan

IT TECHNOLOGIES TO PROMOTE EDUCATION FOR ALL

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 352/356

This paper provides an understanding of using Technical methodology in inclusiveeducation for all.In the world of education there is a continuing challenge to teach each and every one irrespective of their cast, creed, races, gender, physical or mental disabilities, financial capabilities etc.  Technology driven approach can be very effective in addressing these issues. Using the upcoming technologies like Cloud , Big Data , Analytics and Social Media can be change the way we perceive Education. Gathering the data from the Stakeholders, Analysing and Understanding the pattern, targeting the individuals and applying the solutions in Agile way is the key for bringing the changes in the current system.For Example Agile is the approach being used very effectively in the world of IT software development. Its main objective is to be adaptive in order to avoid long term planning and reduce the impact of changes. Inclusive education has its own set of challenges which can be addressed using the Agile techniques. Agile will bring an opportunity to be considerate during learning and adapting new and better approaches as per the need of the situation. Scrum based practice will introduce the concept of iteration, sprints, product backlog, retrospection and continuous improvements. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

www.inclusionbc.org/our-priority-areas/inclusive-education/what-inclusive-education https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agile_management http://agilemethodology.org http://agilemanifesto.org https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Mobile_Analytics_Cloud

Zainab H. Pardawala

INNOVATIVE APPROACHES TO PROMOTE EDUCATION FOR ALL

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 357/360

There are many people in the world who are not able to receive basic education (3 R’s) such as Reading, Writing and Arithmetic (Literacy) skills. Education is the pond of knowledge and it makes people superior to other forms of living things. Its aim is to give everyone a chance to learn and benefit from basic education – not as an accident of circumstance, or as a privilege. The Education for All movement is a global commitment to provide quality basic education for all children, youth and adults. Education is the key to the new global economy, from primary school on up to life-long learning and it is central to development, social progress and human freedom. Infact, education makes people educated, acquaints them with some need based skills.

Keywords: education, innovative, approaches. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

https://www.researchgate.net www.unesco.org/new/en/education

Dr. Talmeez Fatma Naqvi & Dr. Shaikh Abul Barkat

UNDERSTANDING THE OBSTRUCTIVE ROLE OF LINGUAL DIFFERENCES IN INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 361/372

The issue of teachers’ perception and its impact upon the required inclusion of marginalised students acquires added significance on two counts. First, the teachers constitute a core group of those who make schooling what it is.  Secondly, India’s socio-economic scenario is highly stratified leaving vast room for the formulations and operation of perceptions emanating from language variations, socio-economic and religion based determinants. The question however remains whether these concerns stand true in regards to the inclusion of students belonging to marginalised sections of society studying in the state-run schools situated in metropolitan cities such as National Capital Delhi, State capital, etc where most of the persons come from somewhere else but retaining their own linguistic identity. With the express purpose of seeking answer to this question, the present study was undertaken in the Delhi and Bhopal State-run schools. In Bhopal, the State run schools are crowded with migrated tribal students in addition to other low SES children. The answer thus being provided is based on facts that the researcher gathered through a field survey of selected schools. In this study, the ‘perception’ is determined by ascertaining teachers’ views on the language and expression   of the marginalised children hailing from lower segments of   society. The overall discussion with the teachers leads us to infer that teachers’ perception for the overall, particularly lingual behaviour of children is neither sympathetic nor positive. It is discriminatory and even derogatory and, above all, hardly disguised. Teachers passed judgements on the ability of students to communicate with reference to ‘standard language’ that is the language used by middle class the teachers belonged to. The teachers assert rather arrogantly that the children remained deprived of the ability of using ‘mannered communication’ on account of the ‘unhealthy environment’ in which they were being brought up. The overstress on ‘standard’ deflects the enormity of its wider meaning, essence and purpose. In this, the frame is oftentimes determined by the teachers holding the power who perceive the import of value rather narrowly and apply it with parochial rigidity. The monolingual child faces cognitive and communicative problems where the instruction is in the major regional language. Such children suffer for speaking in their mother tongue and not being able to speak the school language. They neither understand the language of the text nor of the teacher. As the teacher does not know the language of the learner and the parents neither know the language of the textbook nor of the teacher, the break is almost complete. The education loses its meaning and falls down to becoming merely symbolic.   

  

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Alexander, Karl, Doris Entwisle, and Carrie Horsey. (1997. )From First Grade Forward: Early Foundations of High School Dropout. Sociology of Education 70(April):87-107. Alexender,K.L., Entwistle D.R.,& Thomspson, M.S (1987) School Performance, status relation and the structure of sentiments: Bringing thr teacher back. ,American Sociological Review,52 (October) 665-682 Anitha, B.K.( 2000). Village, Caste and Education. Jaipur: Rawat Publications,. Bernstein, B. (1975). Towards a theory of educational transmissions. London: Routledge Birch SH, Ladd GW. (1997)The teacher–child relationship and children’s early school adjustment. Journal of School Psychology. ;35:61–79. Bourdieu, P. (1974). 'The School as a Conservative Force: Scholastic and Cultural Inequalities'. In Eggleston, L, (Ed,) Contemporary Research in the Sociology of Education, pp. 32-46. London: Methuen.

Choudhari Shubhangi & Manoj Kar

HUMAN RIGHTS EDUCATION AND INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: TWO SIDES OF A SINGLE COIN

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 372/380

Human Rights are an integral part of our society and belong to every human being. One cannot differentiate Human rights on the basis of race, gender or on the basis of any other background. Human Rights are the consequences of humanity’s mounting and continual insist for equality, dignity, justice, respect and freedom. All these things are needed for decent human existence. Call for Inclusive Education and Human Rights Education has been increasing day by day. Education can play vital role in the promotion and protection of human rights. This paper throws light on the development of concept of human rights education at global level and at national level also. Researcher tried to study inclusive education from the perspective of human rights principle.

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Flower, Nancy (2000), The Human Rights Education Hand Book effective practices for learning action and change, Washington real comet press. Kumar, Sanjeev and Khagendra kumar, (2007),Inclusive Education in India, Electronic Journal of Inclusive Education,Vol.2 No.2. Panda, Pranita.(2005),Responsiveness of Teacher Education Curriculum Towards Human Rights Education in India, Human Rights Education in Asian School, Volume VIII. Singh, J.D.(2016), Inclusive Education in India Concept, Need and Challenges, Scolarly Research Journal for Humanity Science and History Language. Sathiyaraj A., Jayaraman K. (2013). A study on child rights awareness among the primary school teachers in Tiruchirappalli district of Tamilnadu, International Journal of Scientific and Research Publications, vol.3.6 June 2013. Recommendations of National Human Rights Commission, (2007). Module on human rights education for teaching professionals imparting education in Primary, Secondary, and Higher Secondary level. Rajika Press Services, NewDelhi. Recommendations of National Human Rights Commission, (2007).Human Rights Education at the University and College Level. Rajika Press Services, NewDelhi. UNESCO. (2012).World Programme for Human Rights Education Plan of action Second phase, New York and Geneva. Yamasaki, Megumi. (June2002). Human Rights Education on Elementary School Level: Case Study, University of Minnesota.

Dr. Madhuri Isave

TEACHING DISABLED STUDENTS IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 381/384

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

https://www.kaplanco.com/ii/classroom-environment-special-needs https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/disabilities Problems with Inclusion in the Classroom, Howard Gerber on July 26, 2011

Prof. Kulakarni Jyoti Dipak

21 VYA SHATKATIL SAMAVESHIT SHIKSHNACHI GARAJ V SADYA STITHI

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 385/387

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Dr. Shobha kalebag & Miss. Pratibha Rajaram Dabhade

FINDING STRATEGIES FOR INCLUSIVE EDUCATION THROUGH FLIPPED CLASSROOM TECHNIQUE

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 388/390

\"\"Flipped classroom is a technique, which we can use for giving theoretical knowledge about the strategies used for the inclusive education.  It is a pedagogical model and a type of blended learning in which the typical and traditional methods of lecture and homework elements of a course are reversed. Student teachers will study the given topic by using provided study material. Later on, self study followed by classroom discussion session after required gap. If project is given as a homework activity, it will take more time to complete. After the deadline, discussions will be held in the classroom.  The output of the project may be in the form of modules for the inclusive class.  Because of the classroom discussions and brainstorming sessions student teachers will able to find out more strategies to tackle with the inclusive class. This student centre technique will help student teachers to retain the theoretical knowledge for long lasting and they will use these strategies for handling inclusive class in different situations. Here in the effective implementation of the flipped classroom technique, teacher educator’s role is very important.  

Keywords: Strategies for inclusive education, Flipped Classroom technique 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

https://expertbeacon.com/create-inclusive-classroom-helps-all-types-students/#.WIru0OP3Teo https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inclusion_(education) http://www.ncert.nic.in/new_ncert/ncert/rightside/links/pdf/focus_group/special_ed_final1.pdf https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flipped_classroom https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/flipping-the-classroom/ https://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/eli7081.pdf https://learningsciences.utexas.edu/teaching/flipping-a-class http://info.lecturetools.com/blog/59158/The-advantages-and-Disadvantages-of-the-flipped-classroom

Prof. Mrs. Aarti Prashant Gangurde

CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS FOR INCLUSIVE – INDIAN CONCERN

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 391/396

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Dr. Madhuri Isave & Mrs. Geetanjalee C. Rao

WITH NO HOPES, SUCCESS IN SSCE: A CASE STUDY OF GIRLS FROM KMMSG

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 397/402

\"\"KMMSG is KusumbaiMotichandMahilaSevagram, near Bhide Bridge, Pune. And the Municipal Corporation school named Anusuyabai Khilare Primary School situated in the same premises. The girls from this orphanage attended SNDT Kanya Shala, Karve road, Pune. The girls were taken to and fro to this secondary school. This paper narrates the four factors equity, inclusion, learning and orphan girls. Shrikant Bolla and Malvika Joshi are a couple of examples with full support from home. Getting admission in MIT is much valuable for Malvika Joshi without doing SSC or HSC or Shrikant Bolla despite of his visual disability.On the other hand among 11 girls 8 girls passed SSC, is a great success not only for the girls who are stepping in the beautiful world outside their orphanage run by KMMSG,  but also for the team of Ballaleshwar Pratishthan who tried to bring equity and inclusion through preparing the girls for SSC exam. with great efforts. Girls were taught here voluntarily.The method used to teach the orphan girls has proven to be useful for the disabled, marginalized and even for gifted children who have lost the hopes of getting education. This method has proven useful for the normal average children going to normal schools too.

Keywords: Equity, Inclusion, Orphan Girls 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

http://www.quora.com/Educationin India/ http://education.penelopetrunk.com/2014/09/23/how-my-unschooled-son-got-into-college/ http://antiwhirl.com/learning/iits-rejected-genisuses/ www.excelpublish.com

Dr. Madhuri Isave & Shilpa Bhosale

CHALLENGES FACED BY FEMALE TEACHERS WHILE IMPLEMENTING INCLUSIVE EDUCATION IN SCHOOLS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 403/412

\"\"The focus of this study was to identify challenges faced by female teachers while implementing inclusive education in schools. Teacher is the Teacher is the key part of the teaching and learning process, which faces many challenges to implement the inclusive education due to which they cannot play their roles effectively. This paper, bases on a thorough review of the existing literature, critically analyses the challenges faced by female teachers. Since the passage of the persons with disabilities (PWD) Act in 1995 and subsequent implementation of various policies and programmed by the Indian government to enhance the participation of students with disabilities in regular schools, but there has been no remarkable growth of inclusive education. Such initiatives have placed new demands of schools, specially on teachers who have the major responsibility for implementing inclusion at the classroom level. Therefore it is become essential that regular school teacher must take additional efforts to include students with special needs in their classes. But unfortunately the absence of professional development of teachers is the key challenge to implement inclusive education in schools.

Keywords: Inclusion, disabilities, female teachers, challenges 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Ajuwon, P.M. 2008. Inclusive education for students with disabilities in Nigeria: benefits, challenges and policy implications. International Journal of Special Education, 23(3),11. Beacham, N., & Rouse, M. (2012).Student teachers attitudes and beliefs about inclusion and inclusive practice. Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs. 12 (1), 3-11. Lindsay, S.,Proulx, M., Scott, H., & Thomson, N. (2014). Exploring teachers strategies for including children with autism spectrum disorder in mainstream classrooms. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 18(2), 101-122 www.iiste.org http://onlinelibarary.wiley.com

Dr. Girdhar Lal Sharma

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: CHALLENGES AND BARRIERS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 413/420

Inclusive education means that all children, regardless of their strengths or weaknesses, are accommodated in a school and become part of the same school community. Inclusive education acknowledges that individual children differ in their abilities and support that each student receives quality education irrespective of their abilities, disabilities, ethnicity, gender and age 10% of the world\'s population lives with a disability, and 80% of these people with disabilities live in developing countries (Kohama, 2012). However, the experience in many developing countries shows that a large number of children are not able to complete minimum number of school years. They face variety of barriers before coming to school and even within the school. The implementation of inclusive education is a challenge. The barriers and challenges faced by the children with disabilities in inclusive education in India are elucidated in the present paper. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Bhama, Venkataramani (2009) Inclusive Education - Challenges and Perspectives with Special Reference to India. Retrieved on November 28, 2014 from http://ssrn.com/abstract=2187639 Census of India (2011) Data on Disability: Office of the Registrar General & Census Commissioner, India, New Delhi, Retrieved on December 1, 2014 from http://www.censusindia.gov.in Das, Ashima & Kattumuri, Ruth (2013) Children with Disabilities in Private Inclusive Schools in Mumbai: Experiences and Challenges. Retrieved on December 5, 2014 from www.lse.ac.uk/collections/ Dutta, Julie & Banerjee Debasri (n.d.) Inclusive Education: attitude and problems as perceived by the secondary school students.pdf. Retrieved on December 3, 2014 from www.caluniv.ac.in Jha M.M. (2002) School Without Walls: Inclusive Education for All Oxford: Heinemann. Jha, Madan Mohan ( 2007) Barriers to Access and Success: Is Inclusive Education an Answer? Retrieved on January 7, 2014 from www.col.org/pcf2/ papers%5Cjha.pdf

Dr. Rekha Pathak

CHALLENGES, PROBLEMS & CONSTRAINTS IN IMPLEMENTATION OF INCLUSION: INDIA CONCERN

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 421/427

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

http://iosrjournals.org/iosr-jhss/papers/Vol20-issue4/Version-6/E020463950.pdf http://www.dnaindia.com/mumbai/report-study-on-inclusive-education-highlights-challenges-faced-by-teachers-of-disabled-2012175 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13603110601103162 RajibSaha&Jayanta Mete, Implementation of inclusive Education: Issues and Challenges. Arun Kumar Mandal&Jayanta Mete, Some measures of Inclusive Education into practice and realization: An overview. Umesh Sharma, Integrated Education in India: Challenges and Prospects C. Jonah Eleweke& Michael Rodda,The challenge of enhancing inclusive education in developing countries Susie Miles &NidhiSingal, The Education for All and inclusive education debate: conflict, contradiction or opportunity? Maya Kalyanpur, Equality, quality and quantity: challenges in inclusive education policy and service provision in India

Prof. Santosh Jagannath Shinde

INNOVATIVE APPROACHES TO PROMOTE EDUCATION FOR ALL

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 435/441

Inclusive education is a relatively controversial topic for many parents and educators. The idea behind inclusive education is that students with special needs will be placed in the same classroom environment as other students their age who do not have special needs.Within inclusive education, there are two main branches of thinking: mainstreaming and full inclusion. Mainstreaming is a process that allows children with special needs to enter certain standard classrooms after they show the ability to keep up with the rest of their peers.Full inclusion puts students with special needs in standard classroom environments without testing or demonstration of skills. Individuals that support full inclusion believe that all children belong in the same classroom environment no matter what.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Keywords:-Inclusive Education, Innovative approaches to teaching learningInnovative Learning Strategies for Modern Pedagogy 

,18,10,11,20,12,7,6,21,16,14,9,5,1,8,22,13,17,15,19

Kettunen, J., Kairisto-Mertanen, L. & Penttilä, T. (2013). Innovation pedagogy and desired learning outcomes in higher education Lehto Anttoni- Kairisto-Mertanen Liisa – Penttilä Taru (edit.) (2011): Towards Innovation Pedagogy – A New Approach to Teaching and Learning For Universities Of Applied Sciences. Penttilä Taru – Putkonen Ari (2013). Knowledge In The Context Of Innovation Pedagogy In Higher Education.

Dr. Bhave B.B. & Prof. Patole S.A.

ROLE OF LOCAL GOVERNMENTS IN PROMOTING SOCIAL INCLUSION AND PARTICIPATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 442/446

 In A Globalized World ,Not Only Information And Goods But Also People Are On The Move Across Cities, Provinces, And National Borders. Negative Social Conditions At The Local Level Creates Fertile Ground For The Exclusion Of Those Who Are Different From The Majority Of People Living In The Society Based On Their Social, Cultural, Religious, Ethnic Or Behavioral Characteristics .The Objectives Of These Paper Are To Study The Concept Of Social Inclusion, 1 To Study The Concept Of Social Inclusion 2 To Study The Concept Of Participation 3To Study Role Of Local Governments In Promoting Social Inclusion And Participation . Qualitative Analysis Method Was Used For The Present Study, The Data Collected Through The Secondary Resources Like Books, Journals,Magazines, Websites. The Problems   Of Social Inclusion.

Keywords: Local Governments,  Social Inclusion,  Social Participation

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Gray,Molina,G.2000 Popular Participation, Social Service Delivery And Poverty Reduction1994-2000.INDES,Japan Program And IADB;Kohl,B2003 Democratizing Decentralization In Bolivia. The Law Of Popular Participation. Journal Of Planning Education And Research 23:153-164. Angeby,Martin(2007) Social Integration In The Stockholm Region .A Contribution To The Expert Group Meeting On "Creating Inclusive Society: Practical Strategies To Promote Social Integration ," Paris. Daniel, C.(2001)Integrated Programme For Social Inclusion In Santo Andre, Brazil Stiglitz,J.E.,( 1999) , Public Policy For Knowledge Economy. World Bank. News And Media Research Centre, University Of Conberra, Act, Australia E-Mail; Julie Freeman @Canberra. Edu.Au. Van Klinken,R.(2003) Local Governance In Kilimanjaro. Development In Practice. Vol.13, No. 1.Pp. 71-82.

Dr. Londhe Gautam Dnyanu & Shri. Zavare Ajay Janardan

A STUDY OF INCLUSIVE EDUCATION AND EFFECTIVE CLASSROOM PRACTICES

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 447/453

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Chatterjee, G. (2003): The movement for inclusive education, India Together. Available on www.indiatogether.org Dash, N. (2006): Inclusive Education Why Does it Matter? Edutracks, Vol.5 No. 11, July 2006. PP. 5 – 10 Janshala (2003): Perspectives in Special Needs Education in India: A Journey from Isolation to Inclusion. Available on www.un.org.in/janshala/janmar03/ incluson.html-38k MHRD (2005): Action Plan for Inclusive Education of Children and Youth with Disabilities. Available on http://www.education.nic.in UNESCO (2006): Inclusive Education. Available on http://portal.unesco.org/education/en/ev.php-URI_ID

Raut Ganesh Popat & Dr. Shobha Kagade

ROLE OF HEADMASTER IN INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 454/459

Inclusive Education is educating ALL students in age-appropriate general education classes in their neighbourhood school, with high quality instructions, interventions and supports so all students can be successful in core curriculum.School Headmasters are the leaders of the school. As a school leader headmaster play an important role in promoting and sustaining change in schools. Without their efforts, school can not change or improve to become places where all students are welcome and where all students learn essential academic and non-academic lessons in preparation for life in society.Research tell us the role of the school headmaster is pivotal in creating and promoting inclusive school cultures. The environment and culture of the school setting can have a direct impact on acceptance of students with exceptionalities. Including students with exceptionalities does not have a negative impact on the academic achievement of other students. Social benefits occur to both regular and exceptional students in inclusive education. It increases advocacy and more tolerant.Because of the high expectations that come with both the values and mandates to achieve inclusive schooling, schools today need highly accomplished leaders. Inclusive school needs headmasters who are familiar with new techniques and know that inclusive services and supports produce educational benefits for students with and without disabilities, teacher and families.No doubt there are some difficulties for headmasters in conducting inclusive education programs. Separate programs are costly. It require personnel to expend a tremendous amount of resources in determining eligibility. Separate programs result in some students receiving services and others being denied.

Note- Please arrange this paper presentation on Sunday 

,18,10,11,20,12,7,6,21,16,14,9,5,1,8,22,13,17,15,19

‘Leadership, School Administration and Financial Management’-Training Module for Head of the Schools, SCERT. 10th Joint Review Mission of SarvaShikshaAbhiyan, Government of India (2009). www.plan-international.org/Inclusion/Disability www.inclusionbc.org/parent-s...inclusive-education/your.../school-roles-and-r-6 inclusiveschools.org/the-principals-responsibilities-in-supporting-quality-instruction/

Dr. Smita Phatak & Suhasini Bhujbal

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: INDIAN EDUCATION COMMISSION’S (1964 -66) VISION OF COMMON SCHOOL SYSTEM

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 462/467

\"\"Indian Education Commission (1964-66) clearly indicates the intent of the Commission to look at Common School System as an effective instrument to build a society grounded on the principles of equality and social justice.  For actualizing this, what is necessary is acceptance of the principle of ‘inclusion and percolation of the  same across all levels of society. The Commission dreamed of a society which will be free of all discriminations and education having the key role of bringing the social change which creates a socially just and equal society for all. The prime objective of the Common School System is equalisation of educational opportunities .The Common System is the only option that provides the necessary framework for resolving not just the complex multi ethnic conflicts within and across each state in the north east but also for reversing the rapidly growing alienation between the  northeast and the rest of India. If this framework is adopted throughout the nation,India would be in a unique position to offer a meaningful policy alternative to its neighbours across the border.

Keywords: Inclusive Education, Common School System, Features, Implementation and its failure 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Common School System , Retrospect and prospect, NCERT , 1999 Das.Ashima, Das Shankar and Kattumary Ruth, (2013) ‘Inclusive Education' concept Publishing company PvtLtd. New Delhi 59. Indian Education Commission 1964 -66, Government of India. J. P.Naik, (1997) ‘The Education Commission and After, A. P. H. Publishing corporation, New Delhi 2. National Policy on Education, 1986 (as modified in 1992)Govt. of India. UN Convention On Persons with Disabilities. 2006: Article 24.

Prof. Dr. Bichukale Bhagyashree Shrikant

TO STUDY THE EFFECTIVENESS OF EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES APPLIED BY TEACHERS FOR C.P. CHILDREN’S

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 468/473

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Bansibihari Pandit ( Sept. 1997) Shaikshanik Sanshodhan, Ntan Prakashan, Sadashiv Peth Pune 411030. Bapat B.G. (1998) Shaikshanik Sanshodhan, Nutan Prakashan, Sadashiv Peth Pune 411030. Bhide V.R. ( Jully 1999) Shaikshanik Sanshodhan Paddhati, Nutan Prakashan, Sadashiv Peth Pune 411030. Mulley R.S. & Umathe V.T. (1998) Shaikshanik Sanshodhanachi Multatve, Vidya Books, Aurangabad, Third Edition. Apag Punarvasan Kayade (1992/1995) Apang Udyog Kendra, Pune Second Edition, 26 Jan 2000 Menducha Pakshaghat ( Cerebral Palcy) Rastriya Trust, Ministry of Scoial Justrice, Central Govt. India, New Delhi-110002. Tungar V.N. Apang Udyog Kendra, Apang Warta, Tri Monthaly, Paresh Apartment Pune. Walsangkar Shirish, Neurologist, ‘Purntechya Shodhat C.P. FAMILY DOCTOR Sakal, February 2005.

Kalpana Shivaji Salunkhe & Prof. Dr. Suresh Vitthal Patil

SAMAVESHIT SHIKSHANAT SHASANACHI BHUMIKA

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 474/481

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Mr. Santosh S. Rukari

INNOVATIVE APPROACHES OF ANUTAI WAGH TO PROMOTE EDUCATION FOR TRIBAL PEOPLE

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 482/487

AnutaiWagh born on March 17, 1910. She was married at the age of 13 and became a child widow 6 months later. She returned to her parent’s home where she continued her education. After passing the Vernacular Final (VII Std) examination, she took up primary teacher\'s training in Pune. In the final examination, she obtained a first class. She then served as a teacher for 3 years in villages, after which she joined the famous HujurPaga School in Pune. While teaching there, she joined a Night School and passed matric in 1937. Later in 1950, she graduated from the S.N.D.T. Women\'s University. As the eldest in the family & sole earner she had to support and educates her younger brother and sister. Anutai bore the burden of this domestic responsibility with cheer, but as the years went by, she longed to devote herself to social work in a rural area.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Keywords- Innovative approaches, AnutaiWagh, Tribal People 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Maharashtra Navnirman (2009). "TarabaiModak: India’s ‘Montessori’ and the country’s first pre-schooling expert". Archived from the original on 27 Sep 2010. Singh, Preschool Education. APH Publishing.p. 7. ISBN 978-81-7648-757-3.Retrieved 17 July 2012. R.P. Shukla (1 January 2004). Early Childhood Care and Education.Sarup&Sons.p. 106. ISBN 978-81-7625-474-8.Retrieved 16 July 2012. Padma Awards" (PDF).Ministry of Home Affairs, Government of India. 2015. Retrieved July 21, 2015.

Dr. Kavita Salunke, Rupali Shewale & Dr. Vaibhav Jadhav

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY: MOBILE LEARNING FOR INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 488/489

UNESCO believes that information and communications technology (ICT) has great potential to facilitate knowledge dissemination, improve learning and assist the development of more efficient education services especially for Visually imparted students (UNESCO, 2013). ICT can extend educational opportunities to marginalized groups; increase education quality; and reduce inequalities based on gender, class, race, age, and disabilities. Today, large population is using mobile for communication. Now a day, many researchers point out that mobile learning is an integral part of educational process and best gadgets for current scenario. In the age of ICT, we must commit that ever one gets education without any hurdles, we as part of educational system to devote for inclusion of education (Fraser, &Maguvhe, 2008). The widespread diffusion of mobile technologies offers an opportunity to develop policies aimed at participation and social inclusion. Thus, mobile devices are rapidly becoming the key to making information "universally accessible" (Wellman, 2007).The research is based on Bloom’s Mastery Learning Theory, as this theory advocates that any individual who desires to learn can learn and have mastery on learning if learning conditions are modified per individual needs of student (Bloom, 2000). However, mobile learning can contribute to the global commitment to provide quality education for children, youth and adults specially students with disabilities i.e. visually impaired. M-learning has been championed as “a personal, unobtrusive, spontaneous, ‘anytime, anywhere’ way to learn and to access educational tools and material that enlarges access to education for all” (Kukulska-Hulme&Traxler, 2005). A person is defined as visually impaired who has no vision or greatly reduced vision or partial vision and cannot perform their work without assistance of sighted person or assistive technology as the sighted person can do.

In tis paper, we focus on interaction of visually impaired users with educational content delivered via mobile devices, posing a special attention to touch screen technology. The paper is organized in 2 sections. In the primary section, we are discussing about learning for especially visually impaired. And other section we have been discussed about our cases. As a case study, we work on some persons, who has no vision but with help of mobile and other supplementary, they can perform their duties. Today some of them are using this gadget for their profession and earn desirable amount for their life. Peoples with visual disabilities will benefit from the significant social, cultural, and economic benefits of assistive technologyif the information and services are designed appropriately.

Keywords: Assistive Technology, Inclusive Education 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Benjamin Bloom (2000) Prospects: The quarterly review of comparative education. Paris. 9 Fraser, J. W &Maguvhe, O. M. (2008) Teaching life sciences to blind and visually impaired learners.Journal of Biology Education.42-2. 84-89 Kukulska-Hulme, A., &Traxler, J. (2005).Mobile learning in developing countries. Vancouver: Commonwealth of Learning. Retrievedfromhttp://www.col.org/resources/publications/trainingresources/knowledge/Pages/mobileLea rning.aspx World Health Organization, (1997).Global initiative for the elimination of avoidable blindness: An informal consultation. Geneva: WHO; Wellman, S. (2007). Google lays out its mobile user experience strategy (11 April). Retrieved from http://www.informationweek.com/blog/main/archives/2007/04/google_lays_out.html

Kuldeep Singh Rajput

‘LEARNING WITH BURDEN’: ANALYSIS OF LANGUAGE PROBLEM FACED BY PAWARA TRIBAL STUDENTS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 490/496

Inclusive education is key component for developing inclusive society. For mainstreaming the weaker sections of society, we have Right to Education Act 2009 which ensures free and compulsory education to all children irrespective of their region, class, caste, religion etc. But still there are many sections of the society that need attention urgently of them are tribes. The present small scale study focuses on the issues of language problems faced by Pawara tribal students. Good inclusive education is that which respects and accepts diversity. Language barrier is a big challenge for adopting inclusive education in India. The present research paper throws light on the problem faced by Pawara tribal students due to language barriers. They are inside school and still excluded.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Keywords: Tribal students, language barriers, challenges in inclusion etc. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Behera, Smriti. (2015).Communication barriers faced by tribal students in tertiary education. National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, Odisha. Gupta N.K. (2006). Constraints in Education of the Children belonging to Scheduled Tribes: Issues and Challenges. Journal of Indian Education, 32 (2). Pradhan P. & Pattnayak J. (2012). Challenges in Education of Schedule Caste and Schedule Tribe Children: Case Study of an Ashram School. The Raven Shaw Journal of EducationalStudies, 1. Rajput, K.(2015). A sociological study of Pawara tribes as an unrecognized tribes. International Journal of Social and scientific research. Vol. 01, Issue 2. Rao, V.S. (2009). Lack of Community Participation in the Sarva Sikshya Abhiyan: A Case Study. Economic and Political Weekly, Issue Feb 21, 2009. Sahu, Kabita. (2014).Challenging issues of tribal education in India. Journal of economics and finance. Vol. 3 Issue 2. Singh, J. (2016). Inclusive education in India – concept, need and challenges. Scholarly research journal for humanity science and English language. Vol.3 / 13.

Mrs. Shobha Jadhav

EDUCATION FOR ALL (EFA) IN INDIA: ISSUES, CHALLENGES AND STRATEGIES

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 497/505

There are many people in the world who are not able to receive basic education. Education is the sea of knowledge and it makes people rich and superior to other forms of living things. Its aim is to give everyone a chance to learn. The Education For All movement is a global commitment to provide quality basic education for all children, youth and adults. Education makes people educated, acquaints them with some need based skills. According to the millennium Report, Education is a lifelong process and the ultimate aim of Education For All (EFA) is sustainable development. India has keenly pursued the Education For All goals that are defined in the area of the early childhood care and education, primary education, gender, youth and adult education, and quality of education. Therefore in recent past, India has made progress in terms of increasing primary education enrolment, regular attendance rate and expanding literacy to approximately three fourths of the population.  But this time, we should be achieved cent percent literacy after a long journey of independence and huge investment in elementary education.This paper describes the major challenges facing in achieving goals of EFA in India and suggest some strategies for providing education to everyone. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Bordoloi, Ritimoni (2011). Challenges in Elementary Education in India: Various Approaches.Journal of Education and Practice.Vol2, No. 7, ISSN 2222-288X (Online) accessed at http://www.iiste.org/journala/index.php/JEP/article/view/561/450 Dr. J. D. Singh (2013). Education for All in India : The Major Issues, Challenges and Possible Enablers. EducationiaConfab.Vol 2, No. 4 ISSN2320-009X accessed at http://www.researchgate.net/publication/ Dr. Prakash Chandra Jena (2013) Education for All in India: More Opportunities and Many Challenges Eucationia Confab.Vol 2, N0.4 ISSN 2320-009X accessed at http://www.researchgate.net/publication/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Education-in-India http://mhrd.gov.in/rte http://www.educationforallinindia.com/ssa.htm Jhingran, Dhir (2005). Learning challenge in Primary Education, New Delhi:APH

Dr. Mallikarjun C. Kankatte & Dr. Umakant. G. Devaramani

CHALLENGES, PROBLEMS AND CONSTRAINTS IN IMPLEMENTATION OF INCLUSION; INDIAN CONCERNS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 506/513

Inclusion, the process of allowing all children the opportunity to fully participate in regular education classroom activities regardless of disability, race, or other characteristics is often fought in public schools. Inclusion is most commonly associated to the field of special education in United States. It involves providing a variety of activities and experiences so that all students can participate and be successful in the regular education classroom of their neighborhood school. Most educators use the terms mainstreaming or integration to refer to the placement of students with diverse characteristics into a shared educational setting. The term inclusion became widespread in the 1990’s and is often used in place of mainstreaming or integration. Inclusion is a more comprehensive term and emphasizes the addition of specially designed activities that engage all the students collectively.This paper highlights on concept of Inclusion, characteristics of inclusion, importance, barriers of inclusion, and effective measures to implement inclusion in education system. Thus, the overall paper presents the essentiality of implementing the inclusion in system of education and minimizing diversity needs of learner.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Keywords:-Inclusion, Barriers of inclusion, support services, and effective measures etc. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Dr. Manisha Telang

TEACHER'S ROLE IN CURRICULUM TRANSACTION WHILE DEALING WITH STUDENTS HAVING SPECIAL NEEDS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 514/521

Children with disabilities were educated in separate classes or in separate schools for a long time. But we now know that when children are educated together, positive academics and social outcomes occur for all the children involved. Inclusive classes can be active and have supporting settings that get children involved in various activities that develop the sense of mutual cooperation helping spirit and understanding one\'s problems. Teacher of student who educate them by all mean so today\'s requirement is that role of teacher with special need. By getting the required support and opportunity from the teachers, the disabled are capable of achieving  success in different field. Disabled students also need compassion, kindness, love and care from the side of teachers. True teacher can enable a disabled child to overcame his abilities and make him a productive citizen of society. Inclusive education becomes effective only with the teachers having capabilities and aptitude for teaching.There will be no proper inclusive education if existing school systems are not being reformed to make them at the very least-disabled friendly. This paper discusses some of the important strategies which can be adopted by teacher to deal with students with special need. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Alur, M (2002). Special needs policy in India. S Hegarty and M. Alur (Eds), Education and children with special needs (pp 51-66).New Delhi Sage publication. Puri M & George A. (2004).Handbook of Inclusive education.New Delhi Sage publication. Schulz J. B. & carpenter C Dale (1995). Mainstreaming exceptional students.A guide for Classroom teachers. A Simon and Schuster company Needham Heights. Sharma Y., Sharma M. (2014) Inclusive Education special Educational Needs (SEN) of Learners.New Delhi Kanishka publishers, Distributors. Ramaswamy, B. (2013). Planning and mangement of special and inclusive education.New Delhi Kanishka Publication. Kaur, R. (2013). Special and Inclusive School Education, Development and promotion.New Delhi Kanishka Publications. Reddy G., Raman R. &Krushna A. (2000).Education of children with special needs. New Delhi, Discovery House. Chadha A. (2003). Perspectives in special needs education in India: A journey from Isolation to Inclusion. Janshala. 6,1

Suresh Isave & Harshada Shah

A STUDY OF ENGLISH SPEAKING SKILL OF STD. 5TH STUDENTS OF ENGLISH MEDIUM SCHOOL

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 522/528

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Pahuja N.P. (1995), Teaching of English,AnmolPublication Pune Pandit, Kute, Suryavanshi, (2007),Communicative Language Teaching in English,NityaNutanPrakashan Pune Singaravelu – (2007),Teaching technique in English – Neelkamal Publication, Pune Wang Shuqin, (2004), How can I Help the Students Improve their Speaking Ability in the Speaking and Listening Part in the Class of Integrated Skills of English, Experimental Centre for Educational Action Research in Foreign Languages Teaching, Guyuan Teachers College, Guyuan, 756000, Ningxia Province, P.R. China, Retrieved from http://www.actionresearch.net/living/moira/wangshuqin.htm in Jan 2017

Dr. C. D. Sonpethkar

INTERPRETATION OF CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS FOR INCLUSION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 529/531

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/inclusion http://www.nos.org/media/documents/SecSocSciCour/English/Lesson-16.pdf https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fundamental_rights_in_India

Dr. Subhedar Bhagyashri Prabhakarrao

CHALLENGES, PROBLEMS AND CONSTRAINTS IN IMPLEMENTATION OF INCLUSION: INDIA CONCERN

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 532/538

\"\"Inclusive Education (IE) is a new approach towards educating the children with disability and learning difficulties with that of normal ones within the same roof.It brings all students together in one classroom and community, regardless of their strengths or weaknesses in any area and seeks to maximize the potential of all students.It is one of the most effective ways in which to promote an inclusive and tolerant society. It is known that 73 million children of primary school age were out of school in 2010, down from a high of over 110 million out-of-school children in the mid-1990s, according to new estimates by the UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS). About Eighty percent of Indian population lives in rural areas without provision for special schools. It means, there are an estimated 8 million children out of school in India (MHRD 2009 statistics), many of whom are marginalised by dimensions such as poverty, gender, disability, and caste. Today, What is Inclusive Education?, what are the challenges for achieving the goal of inclusive education? What are thepolicies concerning education of children with disabilities?What are the problems of Inclusive Education in India? What are the suggestions to overcome the problems? Keeping in view these questions, this article discusses in detail the concept of inclusive education, including importance, challenges,problems and constraints  to implement inclusive education in India.

Keywords: Inclusive Education, Challenges, Problems, Constraints,Suggestions 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

http:// www.education.nic.in/inclusive .aspQzadand MadhaviR.L.,”Developmental Challenges of special groups and technological determinism.University News Vol.4 ,8 /10/10 yadava,Shalini,Inclusive Education : Challenges and Prospects In India ,Educationia Confab/Vol.2 ,No.4,April 2013 Singh,Yashpal, AgrawalAnju ,Proceeding of the 3rd Global Summit on Education GSE 2015,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia,March 9-10,2015 Sharma,Umesh,Das,Ajay,Inclusive Education In India Past,Present & Future,SFL nasen/2015 Joshi,Kadam,Jadhav(2011)VisheshShikshan,Vidya Prakashan,Nagpur00

Ashwini Wadegaonkar & Dr. Megha Uplane

DETERMINANTS OF SOCIAL INCLUSION OF VISUALLY IMPAIRED ADOLESCENTS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 539/551

Social inclusion is a multidimensional concept involving complex dynamic process interactions between personal and environmental factors. Visually impaired (VI) students are found to be lacking in certain social skills that hamper their socialization and consequently their social inclusion. To understand the social inclusion in VI, it is necessary to assess their social inclusion using appropriate measure with the help of respective determinants or indicators. Through literature study, it was observed that most of the researchers working in the same field,had designed and used study-specific qualitative measures to find out inclusion status. It was observed that no specific tool is made for measuring social inclusion of VI adolescents. Thus the determinants were identified through content analysis, appropriate to assess social inclusion in visually impaired adolescents considering their socialization and further inclusion. This resulted in the development of 31-item self-report Social Inclusion Scale for Visually Impaired (SISVI) for assessing social inclusion in visually impaired adolescents. This measure has three different subscales designed to measure three dimensions of perceived social inclusion in VI.  These dimensions are: Belongingness, Participation and Relationships. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Baumgartner, J.N., Burns, J.K, (2013). Measuring social inclusion – a key outcome in global mental health.International journal of Epidemiology. 10.1093/ije/dyt224 Byrne, B. M. (1998). Structural equation modeling with LISREL, PRELIS.and SIMPLIS. Mahhaw, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, p. 4 Chan Rico (2007).Integration of Haptic & Audio Interaction Design [HAID] to Evoke the Stimulation of Visual Connection for Visually Impaired People in a Museum Environment. Retrievedfrom-http://www.sd.polyu.edu.hk/web/Postgraduate//ResearchStudents Cobigo, V., Ouellette-Kuntz, H., Lysaght, R., Martin, L. (2012). Shifting our Conceptualization of Social Inclusion. Stigma Research and Action, Vol 2, No 2, 75–84. DOI 10.5463/SRA.v1i1.10 Community Care (2010).Proven Practice 22 July 2010: including children with disabilities. Retrieved from - http://www.communitycare.co.uk/Articles/16/07/2010/114918/proven-practice-including-children-with-disabilities.htm Garger, John (2011). Latent Constructs in Social Science Research. Retrieved from – https://johngarger.com/articles/methodology/latent-constructs-in-social-science-research Halprin D.,(1999).Democracy, inclusive schooling and the politics of education. International Journal of Inclusive Education .Volume 3, Issue 3 P.225-238 Harlow, Harry F. (1949).The formation of learning sets. Psychological Review, Vol. 56(1), Jan, 51-65. Retrieved from - http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/rev/56/1/51/ Hilary Silver (2007). The Process of Social Exclusion: The Dynamics of an Evolving Concept. SSRN.Retrievedfrom:http://ssrn.com/abstract=1087789or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1087789 Huxley, P., Evans, S., Madge, S., Webber, M., Burchardt, T., McDaid, D., & Knapp, M. (2012). Development of a social inclusion index to capture subjective and objective life domains (Phase II): Psychometric development study. Health Technology Assessment, 16(1), 1366-5278.

Dr. Anita Belapurkar

ASSESSING PHYSICAL AND HUMAN RESOURCES FOR SUCCEESSFUL INCLUSION IN SCHOOLS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 552/560

The overall goal of inclusive‐ and child friendly education is developing educational settings where all learners are welcome, participating and treated equally. Inclusive Education lays the foundation to an inclusive society accepting, respecting and celebrating diversity. The coverage of this study is English and Marathi medium, urban and rural schools in Pune district. The survey is regarding physical and Human resources for inclusion of differently abled students. Interview with the principals of different schools was one of the important aspects of the research. Principals’ interviews focused on the barriers as well as the requirements (physical and human resources) for successful inclusion of all in the classroom. It also highlights the need of training of teachers regarding inclusion of all. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Ahsan M. Tariq, et al.,( 2012) .Exploring PreService Teachers‘ Perceived Teaching-Efficacy, Attitudes and Concerns About Inclusive Education in Bangladesh, International Journal Of Whole Schooling. AndrejaIstenic STARCIC, (2010), Educational Technology for the Inclusive Classroom. TOJET: The Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology – July 2010, volume 9 Issue 3 BanargiRuma, MehendaleArchana, MangulaNanjundaiah (2011), Editors), ?Understanding Inclusive Practices in Schools, Examples of Schools from India.published by Seva in Action, Belcher, Rebecca Newcom,(1995), Opinions of Inclusive Education: A Survey of New Mexico Teachers and Administrators. ERIC, ED381321 Dakar Framework for Action (UNESCO 2000), Education for All, DeshpandeMadhuri (2010), Case Study On AnkurVidyamandir, Pune - An Inclusive School. Loreman T, Deppeler J, Harway D. Inclusive Education-a Practical Guide to Support Diversity in the Classroom Soni, R.B.L (2003) ?Perceptions of parents, teachers and students about education of disabled children? Department of Elementary Education, NCERT, New Delhi

Prof. Deokar Sanjay Baban

ROLE OF SCHOOL COUNSELOR IN MOTIVATING UNDER ACHIEVERS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 561/565

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Samual T. Gladding, Counselling, (2009), Pearson Education, page no 400)

Prof. Golhar Anuradha Sandip

INNOVATIVE APPROCHES TO PROMOTE SCIENCE EDUCATION THROUGH CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 566/569

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Teaching of Science (2005).Sood J.K., VinodPustakMandir –Agra – 2. Modern Science teaching (2002).R.C.Sharma, Shukla, Dhanpatrai Publishing company. Teaching of Mathematics (2001).S.D.Khanna, V.R.Saxena, T.P.Lamba, V.MurthyDoaba house publisher, Delhi. Teaching of modern Mathematics (2001).S.M.Aggarwal, Dhanpatrai publishing co.New Delhi. American association for the advancement of Science (1993).Benchmark for Science Literacy, New York Oxford University Press. Nagel fornest (1961) The structure of Science London, Routledge and Hegan Paul. Kartwohl, David P.(1964) Taxonomy of educational objectives. Handbook II : Affective Doman New York : David Mckay company, Inc. Honery, R.E.(1964) The development of scientific attitude. The Science teacher 31.33-35.

Dr. Urmila Murlidhar Dhut

BHARTATIL SARVSAMAVESHAK TATHA SAMAVESHIT SHIKSHNAT VISHESH SHIKSHKANCHYA BHUMIKA

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 570/572

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Dr. Amarnath Shantaram Kumavat

PEPAR - VISHAY ASANARYA BALKANCHE SHIKSHAN

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 573/577

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Prof. S. V. Pawar

NEED OF BASIC ELEMENTS IN INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 578/582


As a teacherswe do witness the fact that many of the school going children suffer from learning difficulties.In many developing & developed countries , such children remain hidden as a result of the stigmatizing attitude and negative value dispositions of the community members. As a teacher we know including all children in education system is the major challenge facing educational systems in India and around the world, in both developing and developed countries. On research evidence and ideas from a range of international literature, this paper argues thatelement in gearing education systems towards inclusive values and importance of basic elements bringing about sustainable change.

Keywords: Need, basic elements, Inclusive education. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Dr.UshaRao(2012), INCLUSIVE EDUCATION. Mumbai, Himalaya Publishing House. Khatal D., (2017), School & Inclusive School, Shree Prakashan, Pune

Raibole Vaishali Pandurang & Wakode Devendra Wasudeo

A STUDY OF CONSTITUTIONAL PROVISIONS FOR EDUCATIONAL RIGHT OF WOMEN IN INDIA FOR INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 583/595

 There are estimated 25 million children’s of school in India, many of whom are marginalized by factor such as poverty, gender, disability, caste, religion ect. There for  The constitution of India gives the right of education to the women. This right useful for women education against the gender byes and sex equality. The various policies promotes the women education for The inclusive education in various field.The implementation of constitutional act such as  right to education for women inclusive education can be carried out though various schemes and programs. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Dr. Jitendra Balbhim Jalkute & Dr. Raviraj Furde

COLLABORATIVE LEARNING IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 596/600

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Kulkarni.Bhintade.[2006]. English – Third Language. Kolhapur: Phadke Publication. Morey L.S. [2008] Methods and Techniques of English Teaching. Nagpur: Manohar Pimplapure and Co. Publisher Lado Robert [1967] Language Testing. London: Longman , Green & Co. LTD. ELTAI[2010] The Journal of Language Teaching in India . Chennai: Vol: 48/1 Jan. Feb. ELTAI[2010] The Journal of Language Teaching in India . Chennai: Vol: 49/2 March- April

Prof. Rajshree Rathod

CASTE BASED SOCIAL EXCLUSION- INDIAN SCENARIO AND ITS IMPACT ON BACKWARD CASTES

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 601/606

“Social Exclusion” the term is very much use in the field of intellectuals and policy planners worldwide for identifying the gaps for the development of the neglected people and the pertaining country. The causes for exclusion can vary from country to country in different times; reflecting deferent situation such geographically, historically and politically but the results will be the same in the form of lack of people development and the country. One form of social exclusion which is characteristic of Indian society is Caste based exclusion. A caste system is the major feature of Indian society, it is not only reflects in social life of Indian people but also economic and political behavior of people are governed by the caste system. Caste is the identity of a person in Hindu society. In India, exclusion or inclusion in the economic activities such as production, distribution or any gainful job to a particular person depend by his caste. The paper examines the caste as exclusion of backward castes people from social respects and economic benefits, and to find out its implication on overall development in general and in particular of backward castes. 

Keywords: Social Exclusion, Caste system, Development, Caste based exclusion, Indian society, backward castes.

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Ambedkar, B R (1987; 1936), “Annihilation of Caste”, in Vasant Moon (ed.), Dr. BabasahebAmbedkar: Writings and Speeches, Vol. 1, Education Department, Banerjee, B. and J. B. Knight (1985), “Caste Discrimination in the Indian Urban Labour”. Deshi AK, Singh H 'Education, Labour Market Distortions and Relative Earning of Different Religious-Caste Categories in India'

Mr. Sunil Kalekar & Mr. Yogesh Patil

ACCOMMODATING STUDENTS OF LINGUISTICALLY DIVERSE CLASSROOM USING INNOVATIVE TEACHING LEARNING STRATEGIES

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 607/614

 Inclusion does not refer to teaching the students with special needs along with mainstream. It talks about cohesive development of all varieties of learners. Today’s classrooms are diverse with respect to language abilities as well. We have students from different social backgrounds, speaking different languages studying in the same class. All students are not at the same level of language proficiency. The present paper discusses the need to accommodate all such learners with varied abilities of languages. The paper explains some simple strategies a teacher can use that will facilitate students’ interaction and help them develop language skills as well as confidence in them. The paper also gives some ways for developing classroom culture that will motivate students to take active part in these activities.

Keywords: teaching learning strategies, Act it out, reports, Jigsaw, Take a stand, PWIM, 5W, Semantic gradient, Semantic map 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

https://social.un.org/coopsyear/documents/SaxenaINCLUSIVEDEVELOPMENTTHROUGHINFORMATIONCOMMUNICATIONTECHNOLOGY https://www.discretesearch.com/search?eq=IrxiiHovsSlb2vYqzp6%2BWGjDxDlTiV005V5YxZu0Tf3Mi0iOO6%2FcqGWX46CcWZQV http://unctad.org/meetings/en/SessionalDocuments/ecn162014d3_en.pdf http://www.learnnc.org/lp/editions/every-learner/6776 http://mavoigt.weebly.com/semantic-maps.html www.ncte.org/cee/positions/diverselearnersinee https://prezi.com/z9skef9zswjh/benefits-of-culturally-linguistically-diverse-classrooms/

Mrs. Shubhangi Godse

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION FOR DYNAMIC AND EQUITABLE SOCIETIES DYNAMIC SOCIETIES AND SOCIAL CHANGE

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 615/621

 Social change means that large numbers of persons are engaged in activities that differ from those which they or their immediate forefathers engaged in sometime before. When human behavior is in the process of modification, which is only another way of indicating that social change is occurring. Education is a bipolar process, an interaction between man and his environment which consists of other men and other beings, living or nonliving. These other men constitute the society in which man lives. Education brings dynamic change which causes social change. Inclusive education leads to dynamic society. As each and every part of the society is considered in inclusive education, this manifest the perfection in the individual. The inclusive education can also first bring on the social change at local level, then to the national, then to the international level for dynamic society. 

Keywords: Dynamic society, Social change, Inclusive education.

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

kayaMdopaTIla(2010)]dyaaonmauKBaartIyasamaajaatIlaiSaxaNa- SaOxaiNakt%va&anacaOtnyapiblakoSansanaaiSak kuMDlaoma.baa(2003),SaOxaiNakt%va&anavaSaOxaiNaksamaajaSaas~,EaIivadyaap`kaSanapuNao Madankar R R(2007) Inclusive Education – A hope for children with special needs, Edutracksvol 6 -9 Mehta, Arun C, (1998) Education for all in India – Enrolementprojections,New Delhi, Vikas Publication House.

Asst. Prof. Kirti Dilip Chitte & Dr.Bhushan Vasantrao Kardile

NASHIK SAHARATIL SERVSAMAVESHAK SHIKSHAN DENARYA SHANLAMADHIL VISHESH GARJA ASNARYA VIDYARTHYANA YENARYA ADCHANICHA ABHYAS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 622/628

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Vijay Santu Patole & Deepali Shivram Kharat

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: POLICIES, CHALLENGES AND INNOVATIVE WAYS TO PROMOTEINCLUSIVE EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 629/635

 This is the conceptual paper in nature and it focuses on various initiatives taken by the government since India’s independence in 1947 to provide education to school-aged children with disabilities. Inclusive education should be part and parcel of education system. Here are some  challenges in inclusive education and some innovative activities which can bridge the gap between traditional A education and inclusive education.

Keywords: Inclusive education, policies of inclusive education,  challenges and innovative practices.

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Govt. of India.,“Draft of Inclusive Education Scheme”, MHRD, 2003. NCERT., “Position Paper National Focus Group on Educational of Children with Special Needs”, New Delhi,2006. Rao, I. (2003)., “Inclusive Education in the Indian Context”, NCERT, 16-17 September, New Delhi. SSA., “Education of Children with Special Needs in SSA Confluence Concept and Meaning of Inclusion”, Vol.(1) New Delhi, (2006) Tyagi, K.Ed., “Elementary Education”, APH Publishing Corporation, New Delhi, (2013).

Dr. Pandhare V.D.

A STUDY OF DEVELOPMENT AND EFFECTIVENESS OF THREE RING BINDER SYSTEM FOR THE LEARNING OF UNDER ACHIEVEMENT STUDENTS OF SECONDARY LEVEL

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 636/638

 In education the learning and the teaching of students for versatile developments are the most important. The students are engrossed and are  hitter talents. These talents are developed by teaching and teachers. The maximum students of the class are engaged with at learning. They always in the efforts to complete the required the study .But some students are distracted from the external stimulus / endowments /  environment. Such mobile, Computer, Internet, Sports, Friendship, Family background & environments etc. are the profound impact on the students learning. Therefore there are some students are not capable. Consequently, the students further class and school had backward in the education development. The role of teacher here becomes me important. The identify the diffident students and understand their position / capacity draws a verities of learning experiences and further more decisive learning method implementation. This is the research topic I have been chooses.  I Proposed the three  Ring Binder system and its impact on the  secondary school  over the learning deficiency students.

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

www.studentsorg.co www.google.com Best J.W. and Khan J R. (2008), Research in Education, Printice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi

Dr. Umakant. G. Devaramani & Dr. Ashwini Kumar Purwant

CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS FOR INCLUSION: INDIAN CONCERNS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 639/645

 The Constitution of India guarantees ‘free and compulsory education’ to all the children between 6 to 14 years of age. The Right to Education (RTE) Act, 2012 allows the children with special needs to pursue the mainstream education, but most of them have to go to special schools, away from their peers who attend regular schools. However, there is a need that all students, irrespective of their impairment, should be educated in mainstream schools. Inclusive education addresses this issue.  Inclusive education is an approach to educate the students with special educational needs with other students. Inclusion rejects the use of special schools or classrooms to segregate the differently abled children from other students. Generally, the schools use the inclusion model for selected students with mild to moderate special needs. Fully inclusive schools do not separate ‘general education’ and ‘special education ‘curriculum; instead, the education curriculum is restructured in such a way that all students learn together. The present paper concerns on concept of Inclusion, Inclusive Education, and Constitutional provision given of Inclusive Education in India.

Keywords:- Inclusion. Inclusive Education, constitutional provision, and Sarva Siksha Abhiya Etc

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Handbook on Inclusive Education (2006): DEP-SSA, IGNOU New Delhi .Jha, M.M. (2002), School without walls, Inclusive education for all National Policy for Persons with Disabilities, Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment, Govt. of India, 2006 Bhattacharya, T (2010). Re-examining Issues of Inclusion in Education, Economic & Political Weekly XLV(16) Bindal, S. & Sharma, S. (2010). Inclusive Education in Indian Context, Journal of Indian Education. XXXV(4):34-44

Umesh Agam

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITY

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 646/653

 

Inclusive education is pairing of philosophy and pedagogical practices that allow each student to feel respected, confident and safe so he or she can learn and develop to his or her potential. It is based on system of values and beliefs centered on the best interests of the student, which promotes social cohesion, belonging, and active participation in learning, a complete school experience, and positive interactions with peers and others in the school community. The number of difficulties came forward on the account of spreading education among the children. There are lots of students who suffers due to different reason and are not able to continue their education or even not able to start their education. If the reasons are categorized, it finds as working children, children in tribal areas, street children, children of migrant labors, children with HIV/AID and under chronic illness, girls living in difficult circumstances, and children with disabilities. In view of the above, the present paper emphasized on “accessing inclusive education for the children with disabilities (CWDs) in General Schools‟ and the policies and the framework designed to access education to CWDs with dignity and self respect.

Keywords: - Inclusive Education, CWDs, Policies, RTE, Schools.

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Ahamad, W. (2012). Barriers of Inclusive for Children with Intellectual Disability.Indian Stream Research Journal, 2(II). Bhattacharya, T (2010). Re-examining Issues of Inclusion in Education, Economic & Political Weekly XLV (16) Bindal, S. & Sharma, S. (2010). Inclusive Education in Indian Context, Journal of Indian Education. XXXV (4):34-44 Julka, A. (ED) (2007). Meeting Special Needs in School – A Manual, New Delhi : NCERT Kauts, A. & Bhardwaj, P. (2012). Inclusive Education: Concerns and Policy Perspectives, University News 50(02) : 7 – 13.

Dr. V. S. Sumi

INCLUSIVE SOCIETY: MEASURES FOR INCLUSION AND BETTERMENT

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 654/659

 

Inclusion is the topic of debate now a day. To understand the meaning of inclusion, the kind of society should be of great importance. Nature of society provides us what is the need and significance of inclusion, mainly social inclusion.  Social inclusion is understood as a process by which efforts are made to ensure equal opportunities for all, regardless of their background, so that they can achieve their full potential in life. It is a multi-dimensional process. Its objective is to create conditions which enable active participation of every member of the society in all aspects of life, including civic, social, economic, and political activities, as well as participation in decision making processes. How can this be possible? How can we make all individuals in society be active in all activities? What strategies we have to adopt? How the government able to do this? All these questions must be introspecting by everyone in a society. The role of every individual is worth a lot for the society. Nobody is isolated, and nobody can live as isolated. This paper deals with elements that are inevitable to create an inclusive society, steps to promote inclusion and areas where to be focused upon.

Keywords: Inclusion, social inclusion, society, government

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Gender Equality Action Plan (2007-2009). Making faster progress to gender equality. http://www.un.org/esa/socdev/egms/docs/2009/Ghana/inclusive-society.pdf Goran Therborn (2007). Creating an Inclusive Society: Practical Strategies to Promote Social Integration http://www.un.org/esa/socdev/egms/docs/2009/Ghana/inclusive-society.pdf, (accessed 22.08.2015)

Amrita Kulthe

PROMOTING DIMENSIONS OF SOCIAL INCLUSION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 660/661

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

www.wikipedia.com http://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/socialdevelopment/brief/social-inclusion https://aifs.gov.au/cfca/publications/social-inclusion-family-support-sector/conclusion

Mahesh Thakur

EMERGING NEEDS OF GOOD GOVERNANCE PRACTICES AND ORGANISATIONAL CLIMATE IN SCHOOLS FOR DIFFERENTLY ABLED

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 662/668

 In the 21st Century Non-Governmental Organization (NGO’s) has gained attention and cognizance around the world. As a matter of fact, currently most of the NGO’s around the world and especially in India are trying to expand their horizons in terms of its initiatives, objectives, geographical coverage, structures and outcomes. NGO’s have increased its capacity to intervene in various aspects which includes social issues, civil issues, good governance, human right issues, environmental issues, as well as developmental issues too. Currently NGO’s seems to work intensively on the issues of ‘Good Governance’ and role of the NGOs in the same. The core objective of the same reflects the philosophy that almost all human issues can be tackled with the help of ‘Good Governance’ and effective Organization climate.The article is based upon secondary review literature, it reflects an urgent need for Good Governance Practices and Organisational Climate specially in the schools run by NGOs.

Keywords: Differently able, special schools, NGOs, Good governance practices and Organizational climate   

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Ahamad, W.(2012).Barriers of Inclusive for Children with Intellectual Disability, Indian Stream Research Journal, 2(II). Awadhesh, K.S. (2006). Rights of the Disabled. Perspective, Legal protection and issues: Delhi: Serials Publications, Bart and Mcqueen(2013)Why women make better director, International Journal business governance and ethics,Vol.8 No. Basavraja, M.G. (2007). Economic welfare measures for persons with disabilities, New Delhi: serials publication.

Dr. Rekha Bharat Patil

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION FOR DISABLED CHILDREN

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 669/675

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Clifford. T. Morgan, Richard A. King (1993) Introduction to Psychology Seventh Edition .Tata Mc Grand Hill education private limited: New Delhi. S. K. Mangal (2012) Advanced educational Psychology PHI Learning Private Limited : New Delhi . A.V.Nayak, V.K.Rao.(2012) Educational Psychology. APH Publishing corporation :New Delhi. ShamshadHussain (2007) Understanding Human Behaviour. H p Bhargava Book House:Arga. K. C. Panda(2011) Education of Exceptional Children. Vikas publication house PVT Limited. Department of Education (2003). Inclusive Education Scheme (Draft). New Delhi: MHRD, GOI

Dr. Shivaji Balaku Desai

GROUNDED THEORY’ AS A CRITICAL RESEARCH METHOD FOR DEVELOPINGTHEORY IN INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 676/682

 \'Inclusion\' has been adopted by policy makers, politicians and educationalists from a variety of persuasions. The principles applied are often so imprecise that it is impossible to comprehend them. However, it is to education and the classroom where the focus of this paper is centered. In general, papers concerned with issues of inclusiveness concentrate on stories describing populations excluded from the mainstream of school life. In “Inclusive research” theoretical sensitivity is needed for developing an insight with which a researcher comes to the research situation making the study more concrete and related it to “reality” of the phenomena. This is true and should be used in behavioral studies. The meaning and subtlety of data is recognized and forms the wide creative base and credits both the experience and the expertise. Grounded theory (GT) is shaped by the desire to discover social, psychological processes as propounded by Charmaz (2009). The newer version of GT states that neither data nor theories are discovered but are constructed by the researcher as a result of his/ her interactions with the field and its participants as stated by   Ralph, Brinks and Chapman (2015) which is considered the best method of investigating psychological phenomena and aspects related to inclusive education.

Keywords:  Grounded Theory, Inclusive Education, The Process in Grounded Theory,Features of Grounded Theory Research Design

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Aronowitz, S. and Giroux, H.A. (1985). Education under siege: The conservative, liberal and radical debate over schooling. South Hadley, MA:Bergin& Garvey Publishers Barber, B. (1992). An aristocracy of everyone: The politics of education and the future of America. New York: Ballantine. Cooper, H.M. & Good, T.L. (1983). Pygmalion grows up: Studies in the expectation communication process. New York: Longman. Dahl, R. A. (1989).Democracy and its critics. New Haven: Yale U. Press,

Dr. Abhay Jadhav & Dr. Jitendra Gandhi

FIELD WORK PRACTICE: AN INCLUSIVE SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 683/686

 Social exclusion and inclusive policy are key concepts that are being talked about much worldwide. Field education is a core component of Indian professional social work education that is intended to assist students with integrating theory and practice. The goal of social work field education is to provide a dynamic program that supports students to demonstrate adaptability; to critically reflect on their own practice and that of others; and to perform independently at a level expected of a newly qualifying practitioner. Professional social workers are recruited in various capacities in government and non-government sectors. Professional social workers have ample scope to contribute their self in uplifting the poor, marginalized and socially excluded groups of people for which they need to have a strong foundation in the theoretical constructs of social exclusion, inclusive development, inclusive policy and related aspects. This paper highlights the scope of social work education and practice in different fields.

Baskin, C. (2003). Structural Social Work as seen from an Aboriginal Perspective. Canadian Scholar’s Press. Ferguson, I.; Lavalette, M. and Whitmore, E. (2005). Globalization, Global Justice and Social Work. London and New York: George, P. and Moffat, K. (2007). Redefining Social Work Standards in the Context of Globalization: Lessons from India. International Social Work.

Prof. Sachin J. Sakhare

INNOVATION TEACHING LEARNING PRACTICES FOR STUDENTS IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 687/692

 The present research is to study the Innovative Teaching-Learning practicesfor Students in Inclusive Classroom with prime aims (i) Tounderstand the concept of Inclusion Education. (ii) To discuss the concept of Inclusion Classroom and the Innovative Teaching-         Learning practicesfor Students in Inclusive Classroom. (iii) To discuss the Inclusive Classroom management for Students in Inclusive Classroom. The present theoretical paper based on Innovative Teaching-Learning practicesfor Students in Inclusive Classroom. The present paper focuses on to develop the individual strengths and gifts, with high and appropriate expectations for each child. Inclusive students work on individual goals while participating in the life of the classroom with other students their own age. Also involve their parents in their education and in the activities of their local schools. Develop friendships with a wide variety of other children, each with their own individual needs and abilities.Positively affect both their school and community to appreciate diversity and inclusion on a broader level.Inclusive practice is an approach to teaching that recognizes the diversity of students, enabling all students to access course content, fully participate in learning activities and demonstrate their knowledge and strengths at assessment.The studentteacher interaction is very significant for the Inclusive classroom. The inclusive classroom based on Interactive teaching-learning, Alternative teaching-learning, Parallel teaching-learning, Station teaching-learning, Co-teaching model etc.

Keywords: Innovative teaching-learning, Inclusive Classroom.

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Bender, W. N. (2002) Differentiating instruction for students with learning disabilities: Best practices for general and special educators. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. Best J.W. (2006) Research in Education. (9th Edition)Ê New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd. Kagan, S. (1994) Cooperative learning. San Clemente, CA: Kagan. National Education Policy 2016 NCERT (2005) National curriculum framework Putnam, J. W. (1998)The process of cooperative learning. In J. W. Putnam (Ed.), Cooperative learning and strategies for inclusion: Celebrating diversity in the classroom (pp. 17-47) Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.

Prof. Bhagyashree Dudhade

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: INTERVENTIONS REQUIRED

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 693/701

 Inclusive Education (IE) is a new approach towards educating the children with disability andlearning difficulties with that of normal ones within the same roof. It brings all students togetherin one classroom and community, regardless of their strengths or weaknesses in any area, and seeks to maximize the potential of all students.It is one of the most effective ways in which to promote an inclusive and tolerant society. It is known that 73 million children of primary school age were out of school in 2010, down from a high of over 110 million out-of-school children in the mid-1990s, according to new estimates by the UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS).  About80% of Indian population lives in rural areas without provision for special schools.  It means, there are an estimated 8 million children out of school in India (MHRD 2009 statistics),many of whom are marginalized by dimensions such as poverty, gender, disability, and caste. Today, what are the needs and challenges for achieving the goal of inclusive education? How will an inclusive environment meet the needs of children with disabilities? How quality education can be effectively and efficiently delivered for all children?  Therefore, inclusive schools have to address the needs of all children in every community and the central and state governments have to manage inclusive classrooms.  Keeping in view these questions, this article discusses in detail the background and concept of inclusive education, including importance and measures to implement inclusive education in India.

Keywords: Inclusive Education,Children with special needs, Disabilities, Inclusion, measures, interventions

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Census of India (2011).Government of India.Retrieved from http://censusindia.gov.in/ Chatterjee, G. (2003). The global movement for inclusive education.Retrieved January, 2016, from http://www.indiatogether.org/2003/apr/edu-inclusive.htm Das, A. K., Kuyini A. B., & Desai I. P. (2013). Inclusive Education in India: Are the Teachers Prepared? International Journal of Special Education.28 (1). Giffard-Lindsay, K. (2007). Inclusive Education in India: Interpretation, Implementation and Issues. Sussex: The Consortium for Educational Access, Transitions and Equity (CREATE) Available Online at http://www.create-rpc.org/pdf_documents/PTA15.pdf

Dr. Kurhade Shubhangi Suryakant

PROMOTION OF SOCIAL INCLUSION OF RELIGIOUS AND LINGUISTIC MINORITIES FROM THE INDIAN PERSPECTIVE

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 702/707

 Protection of religious and linguistic minorities in a pluralistic society like India is imperative for Social harmony. Novel paradigms to promote inclusiveness have to be explored. An inclusive Society regarding religions and languages is imperative for a concordant social fabric. The paradigms and needs to foster.Inclusivenesshas to be well understood and appreciated by the educator as a primary necessity.

Keywords: Religious Inclusiveness, Linguistic minorities, Social harmonyNovel Paradigms.

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Deshpande, Ashwini 2011.“The Grammar of Caste: Economic discrimination in contemporary India”, Oxford University Press, New Delhi. Imam, M. (1972).Minorities and the Law. Bombay: N. M. Tripathi Private Ltd. Kumar, A. (1985). Cultural and Educational Rights of the Minorities Under Indian Constitution. New Delhi: Deep and Deep Publications. Mahajan, G. (2000). Linguistic Heritage of India and Asia (pp.121,122). Mysore: CIIL Printing Press. Mahapatra,

Dr. Padmashri Rajendra Bhoje

CHALLENGES, PROBLEMS AND CONSTRAINTS IN IMPLEMENTATION OF INCLUSION: INDIA CONCERN

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 708/714

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Ainscow, M. (2005) From Special Education to Effective Schools for All, Keynote presentation at the Inclusive and Supportive Education Congress 2005, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow peaceful and sustainable development of humanity Alur, M. (2002) Introduction, in Hegarty, S &Alur M (eds) (2002) Education and Children with Special Needs: from Segregation to Inclusion, New Delhi: Sage Publications

Elaf Fkran Ismeal Sufar

THE ROLE OF INCLUSIVE EDUCATION TOWARDS DYNAMIC SOCIETIES AND SOCIAL CHANGE

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 716/719

 This conceptual paperdiscusses the need of inclusive education for the development of a dynamic society and to bring about a social change. It is based on the philosophy and demands of the growing international movement for inclusive education which help and teach all children, whatever their needs and abilities. Taking into consideration the main elements for change are: Inclusion is not primarily an educational or professional issue, but an issue of basic human rights concerning everybody. Children\'s rights to inclusion take precedence over parents\' choice. Inclusion is an on-going process of increasing participation, not a fixed state. Inclusive schools help the development of inclusive communities where all people are equally valued. The voices of disabled adults and children have key roles in developing inclusion. These works for Social Change will lead to action at local, national and international levels to enhance the case for inclusive education. 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Dewey, J. (1939). Freedom and culture. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons. http://disability-studies.leeds.ac.uk/files/library/CSIE-inclusive-ed.pdf http://www.unesco.org/new/en/indigenous-peoples/social-inclusion-and-social-change/ http://www.education-inquiry.net/index.php/edui/article/view/27311 https://capacitybuildingnetwork.org/article6/ http://www.un.org/esa/socdev/egms/docs/2009/Ghana/inclusive-society.pdf https://www.cdli.ca/resources/sdm/DocumentSection/SDMChapter8.pdf http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/oct03/vol61/num02/Making-Inclusive-Education-Work.aspx

Gordon George

ENABLING TEACHERS WITH INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 720/725

 Inclusive classrooms might contain several students with special needs who re mainstreamed full time into the general classroom, or one or two students who spend time each day in both a special education classroom and a general classroom. Either way, your role as a general education teacher is to create a community conducive to helping all students meet academic and behavioral goals; however, you should not have to achieve this aim alone. Ongoing communication is essential for locating individuals, services and materials to best support all of your students. In addition, some key planning and teaching strategies can make a dramatic difference in reaching students with diverse abilities and skill bases.Inclusive education does away with the practice of segregating students with learning and/or physical challenges from the rest of the student body. While the practice of inclusion places extra demands on students and facility logistics, there are numerous benefits to all students, both disabled and non-disabled.Teachers in inclusive classrooms must incorporate a variety of teaching methods in order to best reach students of varying learning abilities. This has benefits even for those students who would be placed in a traditional classroom, as this increases their engagement in the learning process. Even gifted and accelerated learners benefit from an environment that stresses responsiveness from all students.Perhaps most importantly, inclusive classrooms encourage open and frank dialogue about differences as well as a respect for those with different abilities, cultural backgrounds and needs.Despite the benefits, there still are many barriers to the implementation of inclusive education. A UNESCO article, “Inclusive Education,” outlined many of them, including:

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

http://www.thinkinclusive.us/biggest-barriers-to-inclusive-education/ Barriers to implementing inclusion practices Sara Ann; SposaroJulie ;MaraLensink, (1998) http://www.specialeducationguide.com/pre-k-12/inclusion/the-general-ed-teachers-guide-to-the-inclusive-classroom/ http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/oct03/vol61/num02/Making-Inclusive-Education-W http://inclusiveschools.org/together-we-learn-better-inclusive-schools-benefit-all-children/

Karin Isabell Harold Johnson

HELPING TEACHERS TO ENABLE LEARNING IN INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 726/732

 This conceptual paper discusses the strategies and various methods that can be used to enable learning in Inclusive education. This paper encourages teachers of an inclusive classroom to make slight but helpful modifications to enable learning as a complete process. It speaks about a tool kit which could be adapted to teach with in an inclusive education scenario

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Make and Break’ model (Neil Mac Kay: ‘Removing Dyslexia as a Barrier to Achievement’ ISBN 190384203/4). Singh Anita, (April 2016) Effectiveness of Inclusive education in Chattisgarh, SiyalReetika (January 2015), Civil society and inclusive governance. Mina Kalitha (Dec, 2013)A study of the inclusive education programme for disabled children under sarvashikshaAbhijan mission in Assam

Anuradha Namdeo Bhosale

CHANGING THE PARADIGM: DEVELOPING NEW UNDERSTANDINGS OF CREATIVITY IN HIGHER EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 743/751

 Higher education occupies a special position in the educational system of any nation because it is at the apex of the entire educational structure and thus influences all levels of education. Through ideas and innovations, its influence on the future of the nation is also very considerable. It is higher education firstly, because it constitutes the top most stage of formal education and more importantly because it is concerned with processes in the more advanced phases of human learning. The entrants are about eighteen years of age and therefore they are mentally mature and capable of performing at the abstract level. They can analyze, synthesize and grasp concepts and ideas of all kinds. Their creative faculties are also developed adequately. Consequently the content, methods of interaction and organization of work have to be very different from what they are at the school. If education strives to prepare children for a productive life in society, the educational system must accept responsibility for supporting and developing creativity. (Vijayalekshmi, 2013)

Keywords :- Creativity, De Bono, Techniques, The six thinking hats, The concept fan, Provocation,  Movement,  SettingUp Provocations.

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Bono, E. d. (1992). "Serious Creativity". New York: HarperCollins Publishers. Kumari, S. (2014). "Effectiveness of six thinking hats strategy on the development of parralel thinking, lateral thinking and general creativity in high school students". Kurukshetra: Ph.D. thesis, Department of Education, Kurukshetra University. Pal, R. (1986). "Manual for a new test of Creativity". Agra: Agra Psychological Research Cell. Passi, B. (1988-92). Creativity and Innovations. Fifth survey of the educational Research, Volume-1, Pg-170-215.

Sharvari B. Mane

DYSLEXIA IN INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 752/758

 This conceptual paper considers dyslexia as one with the rest of the normal learners. Some strategies and suggestions are given where it would help the teachers in a normal classroom to carry out the proper function of teaching and learning in an orderly manner. It also touches topics of how to deal with the homework. The child is helped to cope with learning in the best way that they can. Also suggestions are given where parents are encouraged how to deal with the situation.

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Bates, A.W. (2005) Technology, e-Learning and Distance Education London/New York: RoutledgeFalmer John W, Best (2013) “ Research and Education” Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd. www.library.up.ac.za/digi/docs/masalela_paper.pdf www.csu.edu.au/courses/master-of-inclusive-education www.csu.edu.au/courses/graduate-diploma-of-inclusive-education

Qusai

EQUITY AND INCLUSION OUTSIDE THE SCHOOL WALLS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 759/762

 This conceptual paper discusses the relationship of other children as well as members of society outside the school environment. It brings out the importance of making children with special needs one with the others building up their confidence of being loved and cared for. Social Skills Children without special needs often can become more aware of the needs of others in inclusive classrooms. The basic elements of inclusive education is also considered while dealing with this question. The benefits and long term returns is also brought out, through this paper. Some suggestions and recommendations are given in this regard.

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/learning-disabilities/inclusive-education/making-inclusion-a-reality/ http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/learning-disabilities/inclusive-education/common-misconceptions-about-inclusive-education/ http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/learning-disabilities/inclusive-education/

Dr. Kavita Salunke & Sachin Ashok Pore

SAMAVESHIK SHIKSHANACYA AMALBAJAVANITIL ADTHALE

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 763/772

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Yousif Khorsheed Saeed

GOOD PRACTICES: SUCCESSFUL INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS.

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 773/777

 This conceptual paper deals with the strategies that are good in a classroom. There are some suggestions given where the inclusive education could be implemented and made successful. It concentrates more on the positive outcomes and practices that would benefit the teaching- learning scenario. It also throws light on the importance and also some principles of inclusive education. To make inclusive education a reality what are the steps and procedures we can implement.

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/learning-disabilities/inclusive-education/making-inclusion-a-reality/ http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/learning-disabilities/inclusive-education/common-misconceptions-about-inclusive-education/ http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/learning-disabilities/inclusive-education/

Johnson Honorene

INNOVATIVE APPROACHES TO PROMOTE EDUCATION FOR ALL

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 778/784

 We believe that all students with special needs or as they are popularly called SEND (special educational needs and disabilities) can be included in mainstream schools. Children with severe needs get modifications like reduction in portion where certain part of their curriculum is deleted; very few get modified curriculum where about 50% of their curriculum is given. All students get accommodations like more time, using of technology to answer, where they are seated most often if they are modifications in curriculum they get modifications in their assessments the teaching is more sensory based instead of the conventional teacher talking and giving notes method. Children are encouraged to use all mediums available to them to present their work. A lot of emphasis is laid on technology. Everything that the child is offered is at a level that is accessible to the child within the frame work of the curriculum.

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

http://missallisonsclass.blogspot.com http://www.kidstogether.org/inclusion/benefitsofinclusion.htm http://nvpie.org/inclusive.html https://teach.com/inclusive-education/ http://www.specialeducationguide.com/pre-k-12/inclusion/

Dr. Niranjana Soperna & Ms. Shivangi Nigam

A STUDY OF THE UNDERSTATED VIOLENCE WITHIN SOCIAL CONTEXTS AGAINST ADOLESCENT GIRLS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 785/797

 Violence against women is linked to their disadvantageous position in the society. It is rooted in unequal power relationships between men and women in society andis a global problem which is not limited to a specific group of women in society. An adolescent girl’s life is often accustomed to the likelihood of violence, and acts of violence exert additional power over girls because the stigma of violence often attaches more to a girl than to her doer. The experience of violence is distressing at the individual emotional and physical level. The field of research and programmes for adolescent girls has traditionally focused on sexuality, reproductive health, and behavior, neglecting the broader social issues that underpin adolescent girls’ human rights, overall development, health, and well-being. This paper is an endeavor to address the understated or disguised form of violence which the adolescent girls experience within the social contexts. The parameters exposed under this research had been ignored to a large extent when it came to studying the dimension of violence under the social domain. Hence, the researchers attempted to explore this camouflaged form of violence and discovered some specific parameters such as:Diminished Self Worth and Esteem, Verbal Abuse,Menstruation Taboo and Social Rigidity, Negligence of Medical and Health Facilities and Complexion- A Prime Parameter for Judging Beauty. The study was conducted in the districts of Haryana where personal interviews were taken from both urban and rural adolescent girls (aged 13 to 19 years) based on structured interview schedule. The results revealed that the adolescent girls, both in urban as well as rural areas were quite affected with the above mentioned issues. In urban areas, however, due to the higher literacy rate, which resulted in more rational thinking, the magnitude was comparatively smaller, but the difference was still negligible.

Keywords: Understated Violence, Social Contexts, Adolescent Girls

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Bjoerkqvist, K., Lagerspetz, K. M. J., &Kaukianen, A. (1992). Do girls manipulate and boys fight? Developmental trends in regard to direct and indirect aggression. Aggressive Behavior, 18, 117-127. Csikszentmihalyi M, Larson R, Prescott S. The ecology of adolescent activity and experience.Journal of Youth and Adolescence. 1977;6:281–294. Dave A. and G. Slinky. 2000. Special Cell for Women and Children: A Research Study on Domestic Violence’, in Domestic Violence in India 2: A Summary Report of Four Record Studies. Washington DC: International Centre for Research on Women and The Centre for Development and Population Activities.

Ms. Bhavana M Mutha & Dr. Bhushan T Patil

GOOD PRACTICES: CASE STUDIES OF SUCCESSFUL INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 798/806

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pastoral _care https://www.teachermagazine.com.au/article/pastoral-care-a-10-step-action-plan https://www.tsc.nsw.edu.au/tscnews/is-pastoral-care-at-schools-important symbiosisinternationalschool.net/final_site/pastoral-care.htmt

Dr. M. S. Hiremath

EDUCATION WITH INCLUSIVE

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 807/811

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

“Education of Exceptional children” -- K. C. Panda “Education of Handicapped children”-- Janardan Prasad & Ravi Prakash Notes on google.com

Dr. Nandini Patil & Prof. Devkar M. B.

SAMAVESHAK SHIKSHANATIL AVHANE VA JIVAN KAUSHALYA SHIKSHAN

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 812/814

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

http://www.testsucesskey.com

Prof. Dr. Sharmila Bhausaheb Pardhe

APANGACHYA SHIKSHANASATHI SHASHNACHYA SUVIDHA

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 815/825

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Asst. Prof. Pushpa Patil

SPACED LEARNING PROGRAMME FOR SLOW LEANER STUDENTS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 826/831

A “slow learner” is a term used to describe a student who has the ability to learn necessary academic skills, but at rate and depth below average their peers. In order to grasp new concepts, a slow learner needs more time, more repetition, and often more resources from teachers to be successful. Integration spaced learning in our conventional system of education minimizes the problem of slow learners and also the gifted. The objective of the present study was to develop a programme based on Spaced Learning for Slow Learners and test its effectiveness.  The methodology used for the study is a experimental. In the present study the researcher has selected the Ten students (Slow Learner)of grade IX from SSC board of Anglo Boys High School in Pune city. The researcher has used purposive sampling technique for the current research. The statistical tool used was‘t’ test. The major findings of this study there was a significant difference between the means score of Pre- test and Post- test of experimental group. Thus Spaced learning program was effective for slow learner students in bringing about learning of the chapter: Life Around You. (The research hypothesis is accepted)

Keywords :  Spaced Learning Programme, Slow Learner student 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Best J. and Khan J. (2005) Research in Education; Prentice-Hall of Publication. LokeshKaul (2005),Methodology of Educational Research; Vikas Publishing House; third edition. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1421733 http://www.work-learning.com/catalog http://www.ascd.org/ASCD/pdf/journals/ed_lead/el_196912_ingle.pdf http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED536925.pdf http://eric.ed.gov/?q=review+of+spaced+learning&id=EJ937893 http://eric.ed.gov/?q=review+of+spaced+learning&id=EJ999814 http://makingminds.net/2014/10/neuroscience-education-trials-announced

Dr. Vishwasrao Sharad Hari

STUDY OF DIFFERENT PROBLEMS AND CONSTRAINTS IN INCLUSIVE EDUCATION WITH RESPECT TO SUPPORT SYSTEMS IN PUNE CITY

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 832/841

 Introduction:- For a long time children with disabilities were educated in separate schools. People and parents used the idea that separate education meant special education. But now in Inclusive education children with and without disabilities participates in different school activities and learn together in same classroom.

(a) Objectives:-

1) To identify the existing support systems for disabled students in Inclusive Education.

2) To assess present situation of support systems in different school.

3) To enlist the different Problems and Constraints with respect to support systems.

(b) Rationale:- Research shows that when a children with and without disabilities attends classes together and teach them together, positive academic and social outcomes occur for all the children involved. We also know that children with and without disabilities simply placing together and teach them together does not produce any positive outcomes. Inclusive education occurs when there is planning, good support and commitment. Out of these, support systems is very important component. Researcher is interested to enlist different support systems required for success of inclusive education. Researcher is also interested in assess the present status of these support systems and find out different problems and constraints in inclusive education  .

(c) Methodology:- Researcher used survey method for study.

Tool for collection of Information:- Questionnaire and Interview for Headmaster.

Population:- Aided Marathi medium Secondary schools in Pune city.

Sample selection method:- Random selection method.

Selection of Sample:- 30 Aided Marathi medium Secondary schools.

(d) Findings:- These are some of the important support systems required for success of  Inclusive Education.

 1) Attitudes and Expectations support.

2) Physical environment support.

3) Curriculum support.

4) Personal support.

5) Guidance and Counselling support.

(e) Conclusions of the research:- There is a great need to pay attention in all these support   systems for success of Inclusive education.

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

https://en.wikipedia.org/ Allen, K. E.; Schwartz, I. (2000). The Exceptional Child: Inclusion in Early Childhood Education (4 ed.). Delmar Cengage Learning. ISBN 0766802493. Scheyer et al. (1996). The Inclusive Classroom Teacher Created Materials, Inc. The Inclusive Classroom https://researchdirection.org/UploadArticle/123.pdf www.ibe.unesco.org Definition of inclusion, accessed October 11, 2007. Archived 2009-10 Feldman, Robert S. “Understanding Psychology Eighth Edition”, (2008), page 309. Praisner, C. L. (2003), Attitudes of elementary school principals toward the inclusion of students with disabilities. Exceptional Children, page 69. Cortiella, C. (2009). The State of Learning Disabilities. New York, NY: National Center for Learning Disabilities. http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/challenge www.inclusionbc.org www.businessdictionary.com Umesh Sharma , Chris Forlin , Tim Loreman Impact of training on pre?service teachers' attitudes and concerns about inclusive education and sentiments about persons with disabilities. Disability & Society Vol. 23, Iss. 7, 2008 Kala Parasuram Variables that affect teachers’ attitudes towards disability and inclusive education in Mumbai, India Disability & Society Vol. 21, Iss. 3, 2006

Prof. Archana Suresh Gosavi, Dr. Snehala Tawade & Dr. Megha M. Uplane

VISHESH BALKANCHYA ADHYAPAN KARYANITI YAMADHYE SAMAVAYASK GATACHE MAHATWA

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 842/852

 

,18,10,11,20,12,7,6,21,16,14,9,5,1,8,22,13,17,15,19

Dr. Sateesh A. Hiremath

INCLUSIVE EDUCATIONFORCHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES AND STRATEGIES OF MEETING THE SPECIAL NEEDS OF THEM

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 853/858

 

,18,10,11,20,12,7,6,21,16,14,9,5,1,8,22,13,17,15,19

Inclusive Education For Disabled Children M. Manivannan* Asia Pacific Disability Rehabilitation Journal UNESCO on Inclusive Education

Dr. Vikram. P. Hirmath

ADVANTAGES AND BARRIERS FOR INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 859/865

 The principle of inclusive education was adopted at the “World Conference on Special Needs Education: Access and Quality” (Salamanca, Spain 1994) and was restated at the World Education Forum (Dakar, Senegal 2000). The idea of inclusion is further supported by the United Nation’s Standard Rules on Equalization of Opportunities for Person with Disability Proclaiming Participation and equality for all. Of late, a consensus has emerged among Indian intellectuals and pedagogues for adopting inclusive education in mainstream schools.

,18,10,11,20,12,7,6,21,16,14,9,5,1,8,22,13,17,15,19

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. (2008).Barriers to inclusive education. Retrieved April 6, 2010, from www. unescobkk. org/ education/ appeal/programme-themes/inclusive-education/thematic-issues/barriers-to-inclusive-education/ Armstrong, Derrick (2005), ‘Reinventing “inclusion”: New Labour and the cultural politics of special education’, Oxford Review of Education, vol. 31 (1) Cigman, R (2001), ‘Self-esteem and the confidence to fail’, Journal of Philosophy of Education, vol. 35 (4) Dr. Usha Rao ( 2015) : inclusive Education - Himalaya Publishing House New Delhi. Jaswant Virk, Alka arora and Richa Sharma Sood (2010) Fundamentals of Inclusive Education Twenty first century publications. Dr. Darakshan Andlib Khan( 2016) - Inclusive Education – Thakur Publications Sanjeev and Kumar- Inclusive Education in India Published by CORE Scholar, 2007 The Salamanca Statement and Framework for Action on Special Needs Education. World Conference on Special Needs Education: Access and Quality, Salamanca, Spain, 7-10 June 1994. UNESCO and Ministry of Education and Science, Spain 1994. Rao Indumathi, - (2002) Country status on inclusive education/special needs documentation good practices, UNICEF, Regional Office. Mani MNG - (2000) Inclusive education, Ramakrishna Vidyalaya, Coimbatore.

Jyoti Narayan Parihar & Dr. Jyoti Bavane

SHALABAHYA BALKANCHE SHIKSHAN EK ABHYAS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 866/870

 

,18,10,11,20,12,7,6,21,16,14,9,5,1,8,22,13,17,15,19

Prof. Kishor C. Sonawane

NEED AND CHALLENGES OF INCLUSIVE EDUCATION IN 21ST CENTURY

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 871/873

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Dr. Sagar Kakade

NATIONAL POLICIES ON INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 874/877

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Dr. Sandhya Vijay Chavan & Dr. Vijay Janardan Chavan

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 878/881

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Vijay Dhamane

CONSTITUTIONAL PROVISIONS REGARDING ‘EDUCATION FOR ALL’ IN INDIA

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 882/889

 Indian culture is diversified by the region, religion, language and class. There are diverse schools in India. To sustain the society locally and globally its Teachers’ responsibility to treat the student in multicultural manner for inclusion. The objectives of this study were to trace out the route of Elementary Education as fundamental right towards the equitable Society, to analyze the provisions about Elementary education and to study the role of concerns for Elementary Education as Education for all. With the help of analytical method various documents, Government Resolutions and references were analyzed and organized. It is concluded that,

1)      The journey of Fundamental Right to Elementary Education and Education for All in India started during British Rule (1880) and stops at Right To Education Act 2009.

2)      To provide quality Elementary Education or Fundamental Right and Education for All  the  following constitutional provisions help it for inclusion of every child.

·         Right To Education  Act: 2009

·         Education of Minorities: Article 30

·         Education for Weaker Sections: Article 15, 17, 46

·         Equality of Opportunity in Educational Institutions: Article 29(1)

·         Instruction in Mother -Tongue: Article 26 (1)

\"\"As Education play a vital role for making a equitable society, it’s a duty of Teacher community to make inclusion of all the sections for equitable society.

Keywords: Constitutional Provisions, Fundamental Right, Education for All, Right to Education.

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

Ganga, R. & Suputhai M., (2007). Children’s Rights As Basic Human Rights. New Delhi: Reference Press. Report: Education for All: The Indian scene (IInd edition), MHRD, Govt. of India, Oct, 1993. Report: EFA Global Monitoring Report, 2007, Regional overview: South 45 and West Asia, UNESCO. Report: Gender and Education for All -THE LEAP TO EQUALITY, in Regional Overview – EFA Global Monitoring Report- 2003-04, UNESCO. Report: Goals and objectives of Education for All in India, MHRD, Annual Report: 1997-98. Mehta, Arun C. Elementary education in India- where do we stand?- state report card, 2005-06, National University of Educational Planning and Administration, India. Mehta, Arun C. “Education For All in India with Focus on Elementary Education: Current Status, Recent Initiatives And Future Prospects” Padmalatha Ravi, “Mid- Day meals: school meals make slow progress”,

Mrs. Vrushali Rokade & Dr. Mohan Kamble

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: RESILIENCE IMPROVEMENT FOR B.ED. STUDENT IN TWO YEARS REVISED B.ED. SYLLABUS

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 890/893

 

,18,10,11,20,12,7,6,21,16,14,9,5,1,8,22,13,17,15,19

Lani Florian, , Martyn Rouse, The inclusive practice project in Scotland: Teacher education for inclusive education, volume 25, issue 4, may 2009, pages594-601 Ashwini Tiwari, Ajay Das, Manisha Sharmac, Inclusive education a “rhetoric” or “reality”? Teachers' perspectives and beliefs, volume 52, November 2015, pages 128-136. Umesh Sharma, Ajay Das, Inclusive education in India: past, present and future, 10.1111/1467-9604.12079 Mitchell, D. and Desai, I. (2005) Diverse socio-cultural contexts for inclusive education in Asia. In D. Mitchell (ed), Contextualizing Inclusive Education: Evaluating Old and New International Paradigms, pp. 166–201. London: Routledge Falmer. Revised syllabus of two year B.Ed. course by Savitribai Phule Pune University.

Dr. Shaikh S. J.

SAMAJALA GATI DENYASATHI SARVSAMAVESHAK SKIKSHNACHI AAVSHYAKTA

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 894/897

 

,18,10,11,20,12,7,6,21,16,14,9,5,1,8,22,13,17,15,19

Dr. Kamble M.S.

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES OF INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 898/903

 

  • ACADEMIA
  • Cite Factor
  • Cite Ulike
  • DELICIOUS
  • DRJI
  • End Note
  • Google Scholar
  • Index Copernicus
  • ISI
  • ISSUU
  • J Gate
  • Mendeley
  • OAJI
  • Research Bible
  • RESEARCHER ID
  • SCRIBD
  • SIS
  • WORLD CAT
  • ZOTERO

NCERT (1998). Sixth All-India Educational Survey. National Council of Educational Research and Training, New Delhi. MHRD (1986). National Policy on Education. Ministry of Human Resource Development, New Delhi. MHRD (1992). National Policy on Education. Ministry of Human Resource Development, New Delhi. UNESCO (1996). Resource Teacher Education Resource Pack: Special Needs in the Classroom. UNESCO, Paris. Booth, T. (2003) ‘Inclusion and exclusion in the city: concepts and contexts' in Potts, P. (ed.), Inclusion in' the City: Selection, schooling and community. London: Routledge/Falmer.

Nilima More

CASTE, CLASS, GENDER BASED EXCLUSION, EXTENT AND MAGNITUDE

May-Jun,2017, Vol - 4/32, Page - 904/910

 India has made progress and development in each and every aspect of life but even today women in genitival and ‘dalit’ women in particular are unable to enjoy any status. As untouchables and outcastes, dalit women face caste based discrimination. As women, they face gender based violence and discrimination, as poor, they face class discrimination and placed at the lowest strata of caste, gender and class hierarchies. Dalit women due to their socio, economic and political vulnerability have been exposed to multiple forms of violence throughout history. It is important to note that there were equally vocal and powerful voices of Jyothiba and Savitri Bai Phule with Periyar against the concrete material and social contexts of dicriminatiory caste system prior to Dr. Ambedar. It was Dr. Ambedkar who gave the historic slogan ‘Educate, Organize and Agitate’ at the All-India Depressd classes Conference. It was Dr. Ambedkar who rather than preaching loffty ideas, took concrete ‘constitutional’ steps to empower women so that they are not reduced to the margins. This paper tries to highlight the reality of the suppression, struggle, and torture of ‘dalit’ women faced in her everyday life. These situations of ‘Dalit’ women are not simlpy due to their lack of education or economical status but due to Hindu religious scriptures. Inclusive education gives  opportunity to Dalit womens to become part of Indian society 

,18,10,11,20,12,7,6,21,16,14,9,5,1,8,22,13,17,15,19

Salwe B., Khakal D.(2016) - School and Inclusive School, Shree Prakashan Ambedkar B.R. (1987) “The Women and counter Revoluation “ in Dr.Babasaheb ambedkar Writings and speeches,vol.3 Education Department, Govt. Of Maharashtra,Mumbai Jafferlot,christophe (2005) “Dr. Ambedkar and Untouchabillity;Analysing and Fighting caste” permenant black,New Delhi Zelliot ,Elenor (2003) ‘Dr. Ambedkar and the Empowerment of women Unlimited,New Delhi,pp-204-218 AshalataP(2013) ‘ Status ofdalit women in India –Caste and gender based exclusion’ Paper- aindian jurnal of research volume 2. Muthumary J(2011)’ Dalit women in India IDSN briefing paper – Dalit women facing multiple forms of discrimination National Federation of dalit women – Dalit women status in India