DEC-JAN, 2016

Dec-Jan,2016, Vol - 3/13
Imapct Factor: 3.189
ISSN: 2348-3083
Date: 04-Feb-2016

An International Peer Reviewed

Scholarly Research Journal for Humanity Sciences & English Language


Namesh Kumar

HOME ENVIRONMENT AS CONDUCIVE TO VALUE ORIENTATION

Dec-Jan,2016, Vol - 3/13, Page - 3218/3221

 

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Anjana (2002): A study of the impact of home and school environment on educational aspiration of 10th grade students unpublished M.ED Dissertation, Punjab Uni. Chandigarh. Bakshi, Jasmeen (1998): “Home Environment as conducive to value orientation,” M.ED. Dissertation, Punjab University, Chandigarh. Hindin, Michelle J. (2005): Family dynamics gander differences and educational attainment in Filipino adolescents. Journal of Adolescence, 28(3): 299-316. Pandi, J. (1989): “Home Environment parent’s child relationship and child’s competence during adolescents” in M.B. Buch’s survey in education (1988-92) Vol-II 9.1018. Willamson Daniel G. (2006): The relationship between perceived early childhood family influence, attachment and academic self-efficacy. An exploratory analysis. Dissertation Abstracts International, 66(7) : 2495-A.

J D Singh

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION IN INDIA – CONCEPT, NEED AND CHALLENGES

Dec-Jan,2016, Vol - 3/13, Page - 3222/3232

Inclusive Education (IE) is a new approach towards educating the children with disability and learning difficulties with that of normal ones within the same roof.It brings all students together in one classroom and community, regardless of their strengths or weaknesses in any area, and seeks to maximize the potential of all students.It is one of the most effective ways in which to promote an inclusive and tolerant society. It is known that 73 million children of primary school age were out of school in 2010, down from a high of over 110 million out-of-school children in the mid-1990s, according to new estimates by the UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS). About Eighty percent of Indian population lives in rural areas without provision for special schools. It means, there are an estimated 8 million children out of school in India (MHRD 2009 statistics), many of whom are marginalised by dimensions such as poverty, gender, disability, and caste. Today, what are the needs and challenges for achieving the goal of inclusive education? How will an inclusive environment meet the needs of children with disabilities? How quality education can be effectively and efficiently delivered for all children? Therefore, inclusive schools have to address the needs of all children in every community and the central and state governments have to manage inclusive classrooms. Keeping in view these questions, this article discusses in detail the concept of inclusive education, including importance, challenges and measures to implement inclusive education in India.
Key words: Inclusive Education,Children with special needs, Disabilities, Inclusion 

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Census of India (2011).Government of India.Retrieved from http://censusindia.gov.in/ Chatterjee, G. (2003). The global movement for inclusive education.Retrieved 11th January, 2016, from http://www.indiatogether.org/2003/apr/edu-inclusive.htm Das, A. K., Kuyini A. B., & Desai I. P. (2013). Inclusive Education in India: Are the Teachers Prepared? International Journal of Special Education.28(1). http://www.internationaljournalofspecialeducation.com/articles.cfm?y=2013&v=28&n=1 Giffard-Lindsay, K. (2007). Inclusive Education in India: Interpretation, Implementation and Issues. Sussex: The Consortium for Educational Access, Transitions and Equity (CREATE) Available Online at http://www.create-rpc.org/pdf_documents/PTA15.pdf http://www.eenet.org.uk/resources/docs/inclusive_education_indian.php MHRD (2005).Action Plan for Inclusive Education of Children and Youth with Disabilities. Available on http://www.education.nic.in Ministry of Human Resource Development.National Policy on Education (PoA-1992). New Delhi: Government of India. NCERT (1998).Sixth All-India Educational Survey.New Delhi: National Council of Educational Research and Training. NCERT (2006).Including Children and Youth with disabilities in Education, a Guide for Practitioners.Department of Education of Groups with Special Needs.New Delhi: National Council of Educational Research and Training. Available on http://ncert.nic.in NCF (2005).National Curriculum Framework. New Delhi: NCERT. PP.79-89 Pandey, Y (2006). From Special Education to Inclusive Education: an Analysis of Indian Policy. Paper Presented at Achieving Equality in Education: New Challenges and Strategies for Change. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (16-21 July 2006) Available at http://www.icevi.org/publications/inclusive_educational.html (Retrieved 10th January 2016) Sanjeev.K. (2006).Inclusive Education: A Hope for Children with Special Needs.Available on http//www.bihartimes.com.

Madhuri & Vedpal

INFLUENCE OF INTERNET ADDICTION ON THE MENTAL HEALTH OF ADOLESCENTS

Dec-Jan,2016, Vol - 3/13, Page - 3233/3246

The present piece of research work is to study influence of Internet Addiction on the Mental health of Adolescents students. 100 college students comprised the sample for the study. Tools used to measure the above mentioned variables were Internet Addiction Test by Dr. Kimberly Young (1998) to measure Internet Addiction. It consists of 20 items that measures mild, moderate and severe level of internet addiction. Mental Health was measured by Mental Health Inventory by Dr. Jagdish and Dr. A.K. Srivastava. The major findings of the present study are a negative correlation of -0.456 has been found between these two variables. A significance difference has been found between the mental health of low and high internet user college students. A significance difference between the mental health of high internet user girls and boys college students at the 0.05 level of significance. A significance significant difference between the mental health of low internet user boys and girls college students at the 0.05 level of significance. furthermore it was found that no significant difference has been found between the mental health of high internet user college students in rural and urban areas and no significant difference has been found between the mental health of low internet user college students in rural and urban areas 

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Finkelhor et al. (2003). Escaping or Connecting? Characteristics of Youth who form Close Online Relationships. Journal of Adolescence, 26, 105–119. Finkelhor et al. (2000). Online Victimization: A Report on the Nation’s Youth. Alexandria, VA: National Centre for Missing and Exploited Children. Finkelhor et al. (2003). The Exposure of Youth to Unwanted Sexual Material on the Internet. Youth and Society, 34 (3), 330-358. Goel, Deepak, (2013). A study on the Prevalence of Internet Addiction and its Association with Psychopathology in Indian Adolescents. Indian Journal of Psychiatry. 55 (2), 140-143. Available at: http://www.indianjpsychiatry.org/downloadpdf.asp?issn=0019-5545;year=2013;volume=55;issue=2;spage=140;epage=143;aulast=Goel;type=2 (Accessed 8 September 2015). Greenfield (2004). Children, Adolescents, and the Internet: A New Field of Inquiry in Developmental Psychology. Developmental Psychology, 42, 391-394. Huston, A. C., & Right, J. C. (1998). Mass Media and Children?s Development. In W. Damon (Ed.), Handbook of Child Psychology (5th ed., Vol. 4, pp. 999–1058). NY: Wiley. Jahanian, (2013). The Impact of Internet Addiction on Students' Mental Health in Technical and Vocational Colleges in Alborz Province. Middle-East Journal of Scientific Research. 14 (11), 1533-1538. Available at: http://www.idosi.org/mejsr/mejsr14(11)13/19.pdf (Accessed 13 September 2015). Katz, J. E., & Rice, R. E. (2002). Social Consequences of Internet Use: Access, Involvement and Interaction. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Livingstone, S. (2010). Balancing opportunities and risks in teenagers? use of the Internet: the role of online skills and Internet self-efficacy. New Media and Society, 12, 309-329. Postman, N. (1992). Technopoly: The Surrender of Culture to Technology. New York: Knopf. Shinde (2014). Co-Relation between Problematic Internet Use and Mental Health in Professional Education Students. International Journal of Science and Research. 3 (2), 194-202. Available at: http://www.ijsr.net/archive/v3i2/MDIwMTM5MzE=.pdf (Accessed 8 September 2015).

Nidhi Kakkar

A STUDY OF ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT IN RELATION TO HOME ENVIRONMENT OF SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS

Dec-Jan,2016, Vol - 3/13, Page - 3247/3253

Parents are an essential part of their Childs environment. Adults need to have a positive view of them (self concept) and serve as role model for their children. Self awareness is another key part of child\'s development. This is why the parents’ ability to provide wings is so important. In order to succeed, children need to gain confidence in their abilities and gain a sense that they can do things on their own. The precious time between birth and maturity gives parents many opportunities to balance roots and wings. Parents can lead the way in providing experiences that enhance their children view of themselves. This way parents can builds self esteem in their children and themselves in order to improve the quality of their lives and strengthen family relationship.
Home environment not only influences the academic achievement but also affects the mental condition of a child. On one hand, congenial home environment supports a child to maintain a good mental health and uncongenial home environment forces her to develop several unpleasant mental conditions, like, tension, anxiety, stress etc., which leads to her poor academic performance. Home environment are often directly connected to academic achievement
Key Words: Home environment, Academic Achievement 

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Aggarwal, (1975.), "Educational Research an Introduction" Arya Book Depot, 2nd Edition, Boring. L.C.(1961), Foundation of Psychology" H.S., & Weld, H.P. New York, John Willy. Bush, M.B.(1979), Second Survey of Educational Research" S.E.R.D., Baroda, S.S., (2000). Advanced Education Psychology, 6th Revised Edition. Garrett, Hanry (1991)., Statistics in Psychology and Education", New Delhi: Kalyani Publishers. Helen, (2000), Elementary Statistical methods. Revised Edition, Bombay : Oxford and IBH Publishing Company. Husen, (1998) English as a Foreign or Secondary Language, The International Encyclopedia of Education, John W. Best and James, V. Khan (2002), Research in Education (Seventh Ed.) New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India Pvt. ltd. Kaul, Parminder and Jaswal (2006),"Comprehensive Intervention Programme on Quality of Home Environment", Psycho- Lingua, 36(1), Jan. 74-79. Mangal S.K (2002), Statistics in Psychology and Education, New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India Pvt Ltd, New Delhi. Sachdeva, (2001) M.S. A New Approach to Teaching of English" Ludhiana: Parkash Brothers. Singh, (1991) Jaspal, Introduction to Methods of Social Research, New Delhi, Sterling Publishers Pvt Ltd.

Y.P.Singh & Brijesh Kumar Kashyap

MASS RAPID TRANSIT SYSTEM – AN EMERGING MODE OF PUBLIC TRANSPORT

Dec-Jan,2016, Vol - 3/13, Page - 3254/3261

 

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“Need to integrate MRTS with other public transport systems” published in The Hindu Business Line on 25 Feb,2011. “Only mass rapid transit solutions can provide India's urban commuters with efficient mobility” published in The Economic Times on 23 Feb,2012. Gwilliam, K. (2002). Cities on the Move: Urban Transport Strategy Review. World Bank, Washington DC CIRT (2004), State Transport Undertakings: Profile and Performance ,2002–03, Central Institute of Road Transport, Pune. Pucher, J., N. Korattyswaroopam, and N. Ittyerah (2004). „The Crisis of Public Transport in India: Overwhelming Needs but Limited Resources?, Journal of Public Transport, 7(4) „Urban transport „ by O.P.Aggarwal published in India Infrastructure Report 2006, Oxford University Press, New Delhi.

Surjeet Singh

VALUES IN TEACHER EDUCATION: ISSUES AND CHALLENGES

Dec-Jan,2016, Vol - 3/13, Page - 3262/3268

 Ancient Indian Education was value based. Dealing with values and moral issues is recognised as an integral part of teachers’ roles. Now, education has an enormous role to play in the social, intellectual and political transformation of the world. Parents, communities and government have always expected schools to develop students who would contribute to the society in which they live. Effective teaching practices in imparting value education have ranges from storytelling, exhibitions, skits, one act play and group discussions to various other formats. In the information technology age, it can be hard to get a grip on the evolving roles of teachers. It can seem as if the role of teachers has grown immensely; they are now expected to be tech-savvy, computer literate and at the cutting edge of education. To inculcate values the necessary curriculum and skills required for a teacher educator. The role of the educators become more challenging & rewarding, in terms of the inculcating the values among the learners. The proper assimilation of these values by a teacher educator can be done through their positive role and prescribed means. What are values and their role in promoting multicultural values education and social justice in Teacher Education Programs that are directly related to school education? Keeping in view the need of the value inculcation in prospective teachers, this article addresses the issue of teachers’ training for value education, some changes that need to occur in pre-service teacher education in order to inculcate values for betterment of the next generation education. Keywords: Education, Values, Prospective Teacher, Teacher Education

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Agrawal J.C. (2005). Education for Values, Environment and Human Rights. New Delhi: Shipra Publication, Haseen Taj (2005). Current Challenges in Education. Hyderabad: Neelkamal Publications Pvt. Ltd. N. Ramnath Kishan (2007). Global Trends in Teacher Education. New Delhi: APH Publishing Corporation. National Council of Educational Research and Training (2011). Education for Values in Schools – A Framework. New Delhi: NCERT. Sahoo, P.K., Yadav, D. and Das, B.C. (2010). Professionalism in Teacher Education. New Delhi: Concept Publishing Co. Gulati, S. (2004). Teaching techniques on Value Education. New Delhi: NCERT. Venkataiah(1998). Value Education. New Delhi: APH Publishing Corporation. Prem Singh, G.J. (2004). Towards Value Based Education. University News. Vol. 42 (45): P.11-12. Stephenson, J. et al. (1998). Value Education. London: Routledge.

Neelima Narayan Tikhe

BHARTIY BAUDHKALIN SHIKSHAN

Dec-Jan,2016, Vol - 3/13, Page - 3269/3274

 

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Madhu Gupta & Indu Nain

ROLE CONFLICT AMONG TEACHERS: A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON THE BASIS OF TYPE OF INSTITUTION, ACADEMIC STREAM AND LOCUS OF CONTROL

Dec-Jan,2016, Vol - 3/13, Page - 3275/3283

The present study was designed to investigate role conflict and its dimensions i.e. work-family conflict (WFC), family-work conflict (FWC), work-professional growth conflict (WPC), work-self conflict (WSC), work-health conflict (WHC) and work-social conflict(WSC) among teachers working in Colleges of Education in relation to type of institution, academic stream and locus of control. While employing descriptive survey method, the present study was conducted on a sample of 300 teachers working in B.Ed. colleges of Haryana. The sample was selected by using multi-stage random sampling technique. Teacher’s Role Conflict Scale and Teacher’s Locus of Control Scale standardized by Gupta and Nain were used for data collection. Means, S.D’s were worked out to describe the nature of data and \'t\' test was applied to test the significance of different groups. The findings revealed significant difference in role conflict and its dimensions among teachers working in govt./govt. aided and self-financing B.Ed. colleges; having internal and external locus of control. A significant difference in role conflict and its dimensions among teachers belonging to science and arts stream except family-work conflict, work-self conflict and work-health conflict was observed. Key Words: Role Conflict, Type of Institution, Academic Stream, Locus of Control 

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Brookover, W.B., & Lezotte, L.W. (1979). Changes in school characteristics coincident with changes in student achievement(Occasional Paper No. 17). East Lansing: Michigan State University, East Lansing Institute for Research in Teaching. (ERIC DocumentReproductionServiceNo ED 181 005) [Coleman, M. and Deleire T. (2003). An economic model of locus of control and the human capital investment decision. Journal of Human Resources, 38, 701-721. Decker, J. (1986). Role conflict of teacher/coaches in small colleges. Sociology of Sport Journal, 3(4), 356-365. Jena (2011). Role conflict among secondary school tribal in relation to their work motivation. Online International Interdisciplinary Research Journal, {Bi-Monthly}, I & II, 22-28. Lathakumar, R. (2000). Relationship of personal and school-based variables of married women to their role conflict. Experiments in Education, XXVIII(6) , 97-101. Millslagle, D., & Morley, L. (2004). Investigation of role retreatism in the teacher/coach. Physical Educator, 61(3), 120-130.

Khagendra Sethi

ILLUSION AND DISILLUSION IN PHILIP ROTH’S AMERICAN PASTORAL

Dec-Jan,2016, Vol - 3/13, Page - 3284/3289

 

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Iannone, Carol. “An American Tragedy”. Rev. of American Pastoral, by Philip Roth. Commentary. 1997. Lyons, Bonnie. “Philip Roth?s American Tragedies”. Turning Up the Flame: Philip Roth’s Later Novels. Ed. Jay L. Halio and Ben Seigel. Newark: U of Delaware P, 2005. Parrish, Timothy. “The End of Identity: Philip Roth?s American Pastoral”. Turning Up the Flame: Philip Roth’s Later novels. Ed. Jay L. Halio and Ben Seigal. Newark: U of Delaware P, 2005. Posnock, Ross. Philip Roth’s Rude Truth: The Art of Immaturity. Princeton. Princeton UP, 2006. Roth, Philip. American Pastoral. New York: International Publication, 1998. The Human Stain. New York: Vintage International Publication, 1999. I Married a Communist. New York: Vintage International Publication, 1999. The Counter Life. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1986.

Rajesh Kumar

ADMINISTRATIVE DISCRETION AND INCLUSIVE GROWTH IN INDIAN PERSPECTIVE; ACHIEVEMENTS & CHALLENGES

Dec-Jan,2016, Vol - 3/13, Page - 3291/3300

Administrative discretion is need and inclusive growth is the purpose. It must be the slogan and aim of every country. Administrative discretion can become curse for the country if it transform in arbitrariness. Administrative discretion is useless if it unsuccessful to get the inclusive growth. Mostly countries had adopted the concept of welfare state. To fulfill this purpose administration had required for some discretion. Administrative discretion is a means to get the aim of welfare state. India also had adopted the welfare concept. So the power of administrative discretion had also conferred for administrative officers. Administrative discretion was given to get the inclusive growth. I want to say through my paper that administrative discretion and inclusive growth both are going to parallel in India. There are many problems in sits way e.i. corruption, misbehavior, negligence and arbitrariness. Professor Dicey thought that administrative discretion is against Equality, and it becomes the cause of arbitrariness, discrimination and unjust so the purpose of inclusive growth may be fail. Key Words- Arbitrariness, Discretion, Welfare, Ministerial Action, Rule of Law. 

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Asima Sahu

SOFT POWER AND INDIA: A CRITICAL ANALYSIS

Dec-Jan,2016, Vol - 3/13, Page - 3301/3314

Baldwin, David A. 2002. “Power and International Relations” in Walter Carlsnaes, Thomas Risse and Beth A. Simmons., eds., Handbook of International Relations, pp. 177-191. London: Sage. Beck, Ulrich. 2005. Power in the Global Age: A New Global Political Economy. Malden, Mass.: Polity Press. Berenkoetter, Felix. 2007. “Thinking About Power” in Felix Berenkoetter and M.J. Williams, eds. Power in World Politics, pps. 1-22. London: Routledge. P.45 Cox, Robert W. 1987. Production, Power, and World Order: Social Forces in the Making of History. New York: Columbia University Press. Dahl, Robert A. 1961. Who Governs? Democracy and Power in an American City. New Haven: Yale University Press Etheridge, Eric. 2009. “How „Soft Power‟ got „Smart.‟ New York Times, January 14, http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/01/14/how-soft-power-got-smart. Ferguson, Niall. 2003. “Power.” Foreign Policy (January-February): 18–27. Fraser, Matthew. 2003. Weapons of Mass Distraction: Soft Power and American Empire. New York: St. Martin‟s Press, p.46 Gallarotti, Giulio M. 2004. “Nice Guys Finish First: American Unilateralism and Power Illusion” in Graham F. Walker, ed. Independence in an Age of Empires: Multilateralism and Unilateralism in the Post 9/11 World, Halifax, Nova Scotia: Centre for Foreign Policy Studies, Dalhousie University, pp. 225-236 Gallarotti, Giulio M. 2010a. The Power Curse: Influence and Illusion in World Politics. Boulder, CO.: Lynne Rienner. Gallarotti, Giulio M. 2010b. Cosmopolitan Power in International Politics: A Synthesis of Realism, Neoliberalism and Constructivism. New York: Cambridge University Press. Keohane, Robert O., and Joseph S. Nye Jr. 1989. Power and Interdependence. Glenview, Ill.: Scott, Foresman and CO Kurlantzick, Joshua. 2007. Charm Offensive: How China‟s Soft Power is Transforming the World. New Haven: Yale University Press. Lennon, Alexander T. J., ed. 2003. The Battle for Hearts and Minds: Using Soft Power to Undermine Terrorist Networks. Cambridge: MIT Press. Meade, Walter Russell. 2004. “America‟s Sticky Power.” Foreign Policy (March-April): pp.46–53. Mearsheimer, John. J. 2001. The Tragedy of Great Power Politics. New York: Norton. Milner, Helen V. 1988. Resisting Protectionism: Global Industries and the Politics of International Trade. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Morriss, Peter. 2006. “Steven Lukes on the Concept of Power.” Political Studies Review 4: 124-135. Nossel, Suzanne. 2004. “Smart Power.” Foreign Affairs (March-April): 131–43. Nye, Joseph S. Jr. 1990a. Bound to Lead: The Changing Nature of American Power. New York: Basic Books. Nye, Joseph S., Jr. 1990b. “Soft Power” Foreign Policy 80 (Fall): 53–71. 

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Baldwin, David A. 2002. “Power and International Relations” in Walter Carlsnaes, Thomas Risse and Beth A. Simmons., eds., Handbook of International Relations, pp. 177-191. London: Sage. Beck, Ulrich. 2005. Power in the Global Age: A New Global Political Economy. Malden, Mass.: Polity Press. Berenkoetter, Felix. 2007. “Thinking About Power” in Felix Berenkoetter and M.J. Williams, eds. Power in World Politics, pps. 1-22. London: Routledge. P.45 Cox, Robert W. 1987. Production, Power, and World Order: Social Forces in the Making of History. New York: Columbia University Press. Dahl, Robert A. 1961. Who Governs? Democracy and Power in an American City. New Haven: Yale University Press Etheridge, Eric. 2009. “How „Soft Power? got „Smart.? New York Times, January 14, http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/01/14/how-soft-power-got-smart. Ferguson, Niall. 2003. “Power.” Foreign Policy (January-February): 18–27. Fraser, Matthew. 2003. Weapons of Mass Distraction: Soft Power and American Empire. New York: St. Martin?s Press, p.46 Gallarotti, Giulio M. 2004. “Nice Guys Finish First: American Unilateralism and Power Illusion” in Graham F. Walker, ed. Independence in an Age of Empires: Multilateralism and Unilateralism in the Post 9/11 World, Halifax, Nova Scotia: Centre for Foreign Policy Studies, Dalhousie University, pp. 225-236 Gallarotti, Giulio M. 2010a. The Power Curse: Influence and Illusion in World Politics. Boulder, CO.: Lynne Rienner. Gallarotti, Giulio M. 2010b. Cosmopolitan Power in International Politics: A Synthesis of Realism, Neoliberalism and Constructivism. New York: Cambridge University Press. Keohane, Robert O., and Joseph S. Nye Jr. 1989. Power and Interdependence. Glenview, Ill.: Scott, Foresman and CO Kurlantzick, Joshua. 2007. Charm Offensive: How China?s Soft Power is Transforming the World. New Haven: Yale University Press. Lennon, Alexander T. J., ed. 2003. The Battle for Hearts and Minds: Using Soft Power to Undermine Terrorist Networks. Cambridge: MIT Press. Meade, Walter Russell. 2004. “America?s Sticky Power.” Foreign Policy (March-April): pp.46–53. Mearsheimer, John. J. 2001. The Tragedy of Great Power Politics. New York: Norton. Milner, Helen V. 1988. Resisting Protectionism: Global Industries and the Politics of International Trade. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Morriss, Peter. 2006. “Steven Lukes on the Concept of Power.” Political Studies Review 4: 124-135. Nossel, Suzanne. 2004. “Smart Power.” Foreign Affairs (March-April): 131–43. Nye, Joseph S. Jr. 1990a. Bound to Lead: The Changing Nature of American Power. New York: Basic Books. Nye, Joseph S., Jr. 1990b. “Soft Power” Foreign Policy 80 (Fall): 53–71.

Ajaykumar Dubey & Ramanand Pandey

SHIKSHAKO KI VYAVSAYIK ABHIVRUTTI EK VISHLESHAN

Dec-Jan,2016, Vol - 3/13, Page - 3315/3317

 

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Ajaykumar Dubey & Ramanand Pandey

MID DE MIL EK SAKSHIMATA DRUSHTI

Dec-Jan,2016, Vol - 3/13, Page - 3318/3320

 

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R. Kannappan

DISTRESS AND BURDEN IN THE CAREGIVERS OF MALE PATIENTS WITH PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA

Dec-Jan,2016, Vol - 3/13, Page - 3321/3327

Background: Schizophrenia is a chronic, disabling psychiatric disorder that poses numerous challenges to caregivers for its management and consequences. The disorder could give psychological distress and burden of care to the caregivers of the patients. Methods: To capture the distress and the burden, distress scale and burden assessment schedule were used to collect data from the caregivers of the male patients with paranoid schizophrenia. The schizophrenic patients had the symptoms such as delusions, hallucinations, disordered (confused) thinking and speech, bizarre or disorganized behavior, self-neglect, and inappropriate emotions which disturbed both the patients and their caregivers. Demographic variables such as age, religion, income, education, number of children, occupation and condom usage, were collected from the caregivers.
Statistics: Percentage, and mean and standard deviation were used to analyze and interpret the collected data from the sample.
Results indicated that the caregivers of paranoid schizophrenic patients had more burdens in perceived severity of the disease, burden in marital relationship and relations with others, and fewer burdens in well being and appreciation for caring.
Conclusion: The caregivers had more distress and perceived severity of the disease, burden in marital relationship and relations with others. The present findings could help the planners to develop strategy/ intervention to reduce distress and reduce the burden of care givers of patients with schizophrenia for better coping.
Keywords: Paranoid schizophrenia, distress and burden of caregivers. 

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Sakshi Vij

ROLE OF COMMERCIAL BANKS IN FINANCIAL INCLUSION PROCESS IN INDIA - AN OVERVIEW

Dec-Jan,2016, Vol - 3/13, Page - 3328/3343

Financial Inclusion is considered to be the core objective of many developing nations like India.
Access to safe, easy and affordable credit and other financial services by the poor and weak groups in
deprived areas and lagging sectors is recognized as a pre-condition for accelerating growth and
reducing income disparities and poverty. Financial inclusion ensures the availability of banking
services at an affordable cost to disadvantaged and low-income groups. In India, the basic concept of
financial inclusion is having a savings or current account with any bank. In reality, it includes loans,
insurance services, and much more. Banking sector plays a considerable role in bringing financially
excluded people in to formal financial sector. In India, the primary responsibility of ensuring
financial inclusion lies with the commercial banks subject to guidelines of the central bank (RBI).
However, due to the gigantic size and diversity of population the commercial banks have been taking
the assistance of various social and financial entities like co-operative banks, regional rural banks
(RRBs), self-help groups (SHGs), joint liability groups, and other non-banking finance companies
(NBFCs). Commercial Banks in a country provides an opportunity for the people of that country to
participate in the formal financial system and to utilize financial services of formal financial system.
Larger the number of commercial banks, larger the scope for bringing people in to formal financial
system provided if banks provide suitable financial products and services. Therefore, the commercial
banks should adopt strong and urgent measures to reach the unbanked segment of society and unlock
their savings and investment potentials. The main objective of this paper is to understand the concept
of financial inclusion in Indian context. This paper makes an attempt to assess the role and efficacy of
commercial banks towards promoting financial inclusion in India.
Key Words: Financial Inclusion, Commercial Banks, Role of Commercial Banks 

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Mahavir Singh Chhonkar

STUDY HABITS FOR ALL-ROUND DEVELOPMENT

Dec-Jan,2016, Vol - 3/13, Page - 3344/3350

 

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